Call*Response – Winnipeg’s Calling

Call*Response: past, present and beyond vol. 1 (edited by John Toone, Nathan Terin, and Michael Sanders) charts more than three decades of Winnipeg’s punk scene. Conceived at a benefit concert for Kids Help Phone, the book is packed with images of concerts, posters, and fans. The stories embrace the mix of activism, passion, and attitude that characterizes the scene.

If you’re passionate about writing, photography, and/or music, keep an eye out for the chance to join John Toone and Michael Sanders for a workshop at the Millennium Library this fall. And while you’re waiting, why not prepare by reading a few books about punk?

Chris Walter, local poet and novelist, has written Personality crisis: warm beer & wild times – a biography, about Winnipeg’s punk rock pioneers. 

Two books about punk or hardcore bands from Minneapolis that enjoyed critical success in the 1980’s are:

Hüsker Dü: the story of the noise-pop pioneers who launched modern rock by Andrew Earles and The Replacements: all over but the shouting – an oral history by Jim Walsh.

Speaking of the 1980s, check out Bradford Martin’s latest book about the relationship between  punk and political activism in the United States:

The other eighties: a secret history of America in the age of Reagan.

For a photo-essay of punk and its offshoots, see
Punk: the definitive record of a revolution by Stephen Colegrave & Chris Sullivan. Published in 2001, this book offers great images and descriptions of the Sex Pistols, the Ramones, the Clash and other seminal bands.

The Encyclopedia of punk by Brian Cogan is a comprehensive resource about punk and its culture. Punk fans will appreciate the list of 100 essential punk albums and brief descriptions of subgenres and bands.

If you’re interested in fiction, try A visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan. The novel is about an aging punk musician and his tortuous relationship with a young, but troubled woman. Egan’s evocation of the excitement generated in San Francisco‘s punk scene in the 1970s and the impact of the passing of time is haunting.

This is just a sampling of what the library has to offer about punk. Don’t forget to look for CDs and concert footage on DVDs.

Lou

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