New to the Local History Room

Cover image for The rise of the new West : the history of a region in Confederation Has it been a while since you read something related to Manitoba? Are you looking for something with a fresh angle on a familiar topic? It’s time to take a look at what’s new in the Library’s Local History collection as there have been several exciting new arrivals.

The rise of the new West : the history of a region in Confederation, an updated edition of Conway’s previous work, covers the political and economic rise of the western provinces from the time of the Riel Rebellion up to the first decade of the 21st century and the rise of conservative politics. This is a great read for those wanting to learn about the rise of socialist and unionist movements (culminating in the creation of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, which would be succeeded by the New Democratic Party), the equally transformative impact economic sectors like agriculture and energy had in shaping politics, and the changing relationship of the “West” with the rest of Canada.

Author Christopher Dafoe has recently published a biography, entitled In Search of Canada, about his grandfather John Wesley Dafoe who worked as chief editor for the Winnipeg Free Press from 1901 to 1944 and became one of Canada’s most influential journalists. The book focuses on his formative years and early journalistic career in the 19th century, with many moves between Quebec and Manitoba, and the unforeseen events that finally led him to Winnipeg. He started teaching in Ontario while both of his parents had never been to school before beginning his career in journalism working for a Montreal newspaper at the age of 17. The book is filled with stories and recollections from those who knew him (including his wife Alice) before he became the man historians remember as well as the personal papers that “Jack” Dafoe left in the family archives.

Vikings on a Prairie Ocean: the Saga of a Lake, a People, a Family and a man is the memoir of Glenn Sigurdson, who lived with his family and ran a fishing business on Lake Winnipeg. Along with describing his personal experiences as part of a fishing family, he gives a portrait of the Icelandic community that grew from the initial 19th century settlers and developed an enduring partnership with the local Aboriginal communities. Sigurdson pays homage to the fortitude of his parents and the pioneers before them in overcoming many challenges and helping shape this part of our province.

Winnipeg’s General Strike: Reports from the Front Lines explores the emergence of two new daily newspapers that covered the strike from opposite sides while existing dailies were shut down. The media coverage from both pro-strikers and pro-establishment, and how it shaped public perception of events, is described in the context of post-World War I Winnipeg where fear of the emerging Communist threat of revolution clashed with workers’ demands for greater rights. The book’s approach to the subject is fresh, easy to read and well illustrated.

Cover image for Saving Lake Winnipeg

Concern about the environment, specifically for the health of Lake Winnipeg, is what motivated water analyst Robert Sandford to write this third in a series of manifestos: Saving Lake Winnipeg. Sandford wants to alert us to the increasing toxicity of the waters of not only Lake Winnipeg, but more and more lakes in Manitoba and the broader Great Plains region. He appeals for immediate action from government as well as business and society in general to combat this threat and prevent the spread of this phenomenon and save Lake Winnipeg from becoming an “open-air sewer.”

Up North: Manitoba’s Last Frontier is a beautiful book of photographs compiled by professional photographer Hans Arnold during an 8 month journey that took him progressively to the most remote parts of our province. The photographs collected in the book range from gorgeous shots of nature and fauna throughout the seasons mixed with signs of human presence like a dam, a road, or an isolated farm.

Summer might be over, and winter is coming, but it is also a great time for readers as fall brings a new crop of freshly-published titles to enrich our minds.

Louis-Philippe

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