Enough Clowning Around

I was inspired to write a blog about the recent clown sightings. That is, until the weird clowns started popping up in Winnipeg. What started off as a prank in the U.S. has sadly escalated into a continent-wide-frenzy.

Even Stephen King himself, creator of one of the scariest clowns ever, has taken to Twitter, telling people it’s ‘time to cool the clown hysteria’.

I agree. Why are we so afraid of clowns? Is it the makeup that hides their emotions? Is it the unnaturally bright orange hair? Is it because a slew of famous fictional clowns  have been scaring people for years?

Let me be clear: Dressing up as a clown to scare people is NOT COOL, especially if weapons are involved. Instead of dressing up as a scary copycat clown this Halloween, why not introduce yourself to some of the scariest clowns around, at the library? We house some of the creepiest clown characters in history and they’re much more frightening than any costume someone might be cooking up in their basement.

It by Stephen King

As I mentioned before, likely the most famous clown-horror-story around is Stephen King’s It. The story follows seven children who are terrorized by the creature.  Usually appearing in the form of the clown Pennywise (in order to attract young kids), “It” exploits the fears and phobias of its victims in order to disguise itself while hunting its prey. You might want to leave the lights on after reading this one…

Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore & Brian Bolland

The Joker is one of the most memorable villains not only in the Batman series, but possibly of all time. In his comic book appearances, he is shown as a psychotic criminal mastermind with a twisted, sadistic sense of humor. Although he does not possess any superpowers, he uses his expertise in chemical engineering to develop weapons like razor-tipped playing cards, or acid-spraying lapel flowers and play deadly pranks on his enemies. Come check out our graphic novel section and read one that features him, such as The Killing Joke.

polterPoltergeist

Nothing says creepy like a ghost talking to a little girl through a TV set. At first playful and friendly, Carol Anne’s ghost friends become unexpectedly menacing, and an exorcist must be called in once she goes missing. Starring Craig T. Nelson and written by Steven Spielberg, Poltergeist is a 1980s horror classic. And who can forget that clown scene?

Clown Girl by Monica Drake

‘Sniffles the Clown’ isn’t a scary clown, but she’s certainly an endearing one. She struggles to live out her dreams in Baloneytown, surrounded by petty crime, balloon animals and rubber chickens. In an effort to support herself and her lazy boyfriend, she finds herself turning into a ‘corporate clown’, trapped in a cycle of meaningless, high-paid gigs. Monica Drake manages to raise questions of gender, class and prejudice while incorporating the bizarre, humorous and gritty.

For more scary fiction, check out our “On a Dark and Stormy Night” display at Millennium!

Brittany

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