The Scotiabank Giller Prize’s 2016 Shortlist!

The Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Canadian literary award announced each November, is a great way to compile a Christmas gift wish list – for friends or yourself. If you are interested in reading or promoting new Canadian literature this is a great place to start. This shortlist of 6 titles was chosen from a longlist of 12 books announced in September. (The 12, in turn, came from a list of 161 titles submitted by publishers from every region of the country.) And the 2016 winner will be announced at a televised ceremony hosted by CBC’s Steve Patterson on November 7. Which one would you nominate to receive the Prize this year? And which one will you consider giving to a loved one this Xmas? I have my eye on the Gary Barwin novel about the wise, satirical parrot!

awad-13-ways-of-looking-at-a-fat-girl.jpg 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl by Mona Awad

“Everyone loves Lizzie. She is the confidant, the late night go-to, and she is always there and hungry for attention. Lizzie becomes even more obsessed and needy when she no longer feels insecure about being overweight and it becomes painfully obvious that she will always feel bad about herself. A candid and sad look at how we mistreat people with different body types.”

barwin-yiddish-for-pirates.jpg Yiddish for Pirates by Gary Barwin

“Yiddish for Pirates is a hilarious, swashbuckling yet powerful tale of pirates, buried treasure and a search for the Fountain of Youth, told in the ribald, philosophical voice of a 500-year-old Jewish parrot. Set in the years around 1492, the book recounts the compelling story of Moishe, a Bar Mitzvah boy who leaves home to join a ship’s crew, where he meets Aaron, the polyglot parrot who becomes his near-constant companion… Rich with puns, colourful language, post-colonial satire and Kabbalistic hijinks, Yiddish for Pirates is also a compelling examination of morality, memory, identity and persecution from one of this country’s most talented writers.”

donoghue-the-wonder.jpg

The Wonder by Emma Donoghue

“A village in 1850s Ireland is baffled by Anna O’Donnell’s fast. A little girl appears to be thriving after months without food, and the story of this ‘wonder’ has reached fever pitch. Tourists flock in droves to the O’Donnell family’s modest cabin, and an international journalist is sent to cover the sensational story. Enter Lib, an English nurse trained by Florence Nightingale, who is hired to keep watch for two weeks and determine whether or not Anna is a fraud. As Anna deteriorates, Lib finds herself responsible not just for the care of a child, but for getting to the root of why the child may actually be the victim of murder in slow motion.”

whittall-the-best-kind-of-people.jpg The Best Kind of People by Zoe Whittall

“George Woodbury, an affable teacher and beloved husband and father, is arrested for sexual impropriety at a prestigious prep school. His wife, Joan, vaults between denial and rage as the community she loved turns on her. Their daughter, Sadie, a popular over-achieving high school senior, becomes a social pariah. Their son, Andrew, assists in his father’s defense, while wrestling with his own unhappy memories of his teen years. A local author tries to exploit their story, while an unlikely men’s rights activist attempts to get Sadie onside their cause. With George locked up, how do the members of his family pick up the pieces and keep living their lives? How do they defend someone they love while wrestling with the possibility of his guilt?”

thien-do-not-say-we-have-nothing.jpg Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeline Thien

“An extraordinary novel set in China before, during and after the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Madeleine Thien’s new novel is breathtaking in scope and ambition even as it is hauntingly intimate. With the ease and skill of a master storyteller, Thien takes us inside an extended family in China, showing us the lives of two successive generations–those who lived through Mao’s Cultural Revolution in the mid-twentieth century; and the children of the survivors, who became the students protesting in Tiananmen Square in 1989, in one of the most important political moments of the past century. With exquisite writing sharpened by a surprising vein of wit and sly humour, Thien has crafted unforgettable characters who are by turns flinty and headstrong, dreamy and tender, foolish and wise…With maturity and sophistication, humour and beauty, a huge heart and impressive understanding, Thien has crafted a novel that is at once beautifully intimate and grandly political.”

 

leroux-the-party-wall.jpg The Party Wall by Catherine Leroux

“Catherine Leroux’s first novel, translated into English brilliantly by Lazer Lederhendler, ties together stories about siblings joined in surprising ways. A woman learns that she absorbed her twin sister’s body in the womb and that she has two sets of DNA; a girl in the deep South pushes her sister out of the way of a speeding train, losing her legs; and a political couple learn that they are non-identical twins separated at birth. The Party Wall establishes Leroux as one of North America’s most intelligent and innovative young authors.”

Enjoy!

Lyle

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