Charleswood Staff Picks

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Fiction and memoirs, movies and music. Whatever it is, there’s a library staff member who loves it. Many WPL branches have displays of the top choices of the folks who work there, and Charleswood Library is one of them. Now that it’s getting chilly, and thoughts are turning to taking some inside time with a good book, we thought we’d share our number one, top-of-the-top choices with you all in cyberland. But there’s lots more to share, so if you’re in the neighborhood, please come by to browse the rest of our display.

Candice’s top pick:

My recommendation is The Fireman by Joe Hill. I really enjoy this author, because his style is reminiscent of his father’s (Stephen King), but still clearly his own.

Ian’s top pick:

My staff pick would be an upcoming book club selection, Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson.  I like all of Larson’s books, but this one especially.  He’s a master of suspense, yet solely writes non-fiction literature – if that’s a thing.  His books read more like thrillers than histories.  As in all his books, he carefully follows two seemingly separate stories (in this case it’s life on an early 20th century luxury liner and life on a WWI German U-Boat – hugely and starkly different realities – one can practically smell the lavender soap on the Lusitania, and the watery grease in the submarine), whose narratives eventually collide in the most earth-shattering of ways.

Danielle’s top pick:

A Great Reckoning by Louise Penny

Any Louise Penny book is great! Her novels are set in “Three Pines” Quebec with a slew of interesting characters and the protagonist, an Inspector Gamache, is a detective who solves murders.

Michael’s top pick:

Folks, This Ain’t Normal by Joel Salatin

If you’re curious about small farms and the push towards sustainability, this broad ranging book brings the cumulative wit and wisdom of Salatin, and details the life of his multigenerational farm in Virginia. He goes deep to explain his can’t-hold-back antipathy toward the way modern agriculture has impacted our way of life.

Sarah’s top pick:

Prairie Ostrich by Tamai Kobayashi

Kobayashi has a sharp eye for the poetic in the everyday, and for the small resonant truths that gleam amidst the seemingly mundane.” [From Goose Lane Edition’s website].

Ingrid’s top pick:

A book that I have recommended many times is The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton. I also just finished The Lake House by Kate Morton, and would highly recommend both titles.  If you enjoy reading books with beautiful settings, where the past and present intertwine, and that have an element of mystery thrown in, then you will thoroughly enjoy books by Kate Morton.  Her stories are captivating and the author keeps you guessing as the story slowly unravels.  In The Forgotten Garden a young women named Cassandra searches for her true identity and discovers her family’s history and secrets that have been hidden for generations.

Shelley’s top pick:

Under One Roof : Lessons I Learned From A Tough Old Woman In A Little Old House by Barry Martin

A heartwarming true story about a feisty octogenarian, that refuses to leave her tiny home as a Super Mall is constructed around her. Despite the offer of millions of dollars, Edith Macefield, stubbornly stands her ground as construction foreman Barry Martin, helps her maintain her dignity and respect in the true spirit of human kindness.

Erica’s top pick:

The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers

A seemingly simple story of an lovable ragtag crew  and their patchwork ship (think Firefly), trying to make an honest living building wormholes while facing questions of what it means to be human in a universe filled with other species; invoking questions of sameness and difference, aggression and peace, friendship and family.

Tegan’s top pick:

My pick is Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger. This book is the perfect fall read, twins Julia and Valentina inherit their Aunt Elspeth’s London apartment and find their lives intertwining with the peculiar residents of the apartment block. I love to recommend it because it has classic ghost story elements coupled with modern characters, and is set in the spooky Highgate Cemetery in London. Niffenegger does an amazing job of bringing the characters to life, and making you feel like you’re there in the cemetery as well.

 

Happy reading!

– Charleswood Library staff (pictured below)

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