What’s New In the Local History Room?

We have a few new reasons for you to come and visit the Local History Room.  A new display about the history of the railway system and how it shaped Manitoba is ready to explore, with artifacts and information generously loaned to us by the Manitoba Railway Museum  –  come and check it out! It’s also time to have a look at what’s new in the room’s collection, as it keeps growing with new additions.

Retired Winnipeg lawyer Norm Larsen is back with a new legal read: Notable People from Manitoba’s Legal History, in which he describes 32 “notables” connected to Manitoba and its legal system in quotations and anecdotes. The notables include Nellie McClung, Hugh John Macdonald son of the first PM and briefly Premier of Manitoba, Sam Freedman, Thomas Douglas (Lord Selkirk) who suffered “death by litigation”, Chief Peguis and Sister Geraldine MacNamara “the activist nun with a law degree”.  This is an easy and informative read.

 

Firmin Wyndels : the Belgian builder by James B. Wyndels tells of the man who came from Europe at the head of Wyndels Construction Company in 1909 as part of the growing Belgian community in the St. Boniface area and built colleges, churches and homes in Manitoba, some that still stand today, including the Fort Garry Church and the Sacred Heart College in Swan Lake.

 

For 15 years, Karen Toole wrote a spiritual advice column on the Faith Page of the Winnipeg Free Press, dealing with the role of religion and faith in everyday issues and how it could help guide us in our real-life struggles and overcome human suffering in all its forms. Reflections : a selection of columns written for the Faith Page of the Winnipeg Free Press 1994-2001 was compiled in response to many of her readers’ requests to offer a selection of her writings in a more permanent form. I noted a quotation from one of her column from 1998 that best sums up her humanistic view: “Religious coercion can kill faith.”

 

27885_the_hot_line_cover_HR
 Hot Line : how the legendary trio of Hull, Hedberg and Nilsson transformed hockey and led the Winnipeg Jets to greatness chronicles how Bobby Hull, Anders Hedberg and Ulf Nilsson came together to form a dynamic line that saw the Winnipeg Jets win two World Hockey Association championships (which rivaled the NHL until 1979). On January 5, 1978 they helped beat the Soviet Red Army Squad in front of a packed Winnipeg Arena crowd, the first time a North American club team ever managed to achieve this. Their chemistry on the ice and impact on the game is explored as well as the resulting influx of new European players into the NHL in the years following.

 

Cover image for Stay, breathe with me : the gift of compassionate medicine

Stay, breathe with me : the gift of compassionate medicine shares Helen Allison’s insights into the need to stop seeing patients simply as diseases needing cures and technologies but as living beings with symptoms and suffering that need to be addressed as a whole, with nonjudgmental medicine delivered with compassion. Several intimate stories tell of her experiences with her own patients in palliative care and the lessons she learned from them as they struggled with various, often fatal, ailments and how everyone, physicians or relatives, can contribute to improve their quality of life.

Finally, a title not in the Local History Room collection yet but which I would like to recommend for local fiction and horror fans is The Shadow Over Portage and Main: Weird Fictions, an anthology of short stories from authors who were influenced by their stay in Winnipeg. Whether it’s the extremes in our weather, our reputation for crime and murder, or our unique mix of cultures and ethnicities, authors like David Annandale, Eric Bradshaw and Keith Cadieux among others have written tales about the dark and gothic side of the city. My personal favourite is the story of a woman who discovers a book about superstition that has troubling effects on people who come in contact with it. Most of the stories are meant to inspire unease and fear, some of them have ghosts (predictably) and other supernatural threats, some don’t even mention Winnipeg but we are meant to recognize its “vibes”, which leads to the conclusion that our city can be quite a dark place!

Drop by and have a look in person, or feel free to explore the Local History and Genealogy Subject Guide for more of our recommended online resources to explore Manitoba’s past.

Louis-Philippe

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