Category Archives: Library News

BookFest! The Bookiest of Days!

[Yes, we know ‘bookiest’ isn’t a word – but we couldn’t find the perfect one, so we made one up.]

We are super excited to have put together a really special event – our first ever BookFest is just two weeks away on Saturday, November 19! What is a book fest? Well I’m glad you asked. It’s a smorgasbord of prairie book goodness taking over the second floor of Millennium Library, brought to you by Winnipeg Public Library as well as the Association of Manitoba Book Publishers, and generously funded by the Winnipeg Public Library Board. There are tons of things planned:

1-handwrittenBook Tastings

Like a wine tasting — but with books! We will provide small yummy samples of new and top titles in prairie fiction and non-fiction. A sure way to find new favourites, with one of the showcased books up for grabs at every ‘tasting’.
Running time is 11 am – 4 pm in the Anne Smigel Room (second floor, west side of the library).

Here are the 30-minute seatings:

11-11:30 am Life and Death: notable new memoirs & mysteries

12-12:30 pm Past and Present: compelling local history and military must-reads

1-1:30 pm Fact and Fiction: hot (and hidden gems) in non-fiction and fiction

3-3:30 pm Turtle Island Reads: new and classic Indigenous titles

2How to Judge a Book by Its Cover

I’ve started to notice a trend in what books pique my interest enough to pick them up (bold colours, retro photographs). What kind of cover makes you reach for a particular book? How does a publisher choose which cover to use? Why do so many book covers feature headless people, anyway? Charlene Diehl of the Winnipeg International Writers Festival will lead a discussion 2-3 pm in the Carol Shields Auditorium featuring cover designers from Doowah Design and Mel Matheson, Librarian Barbara Bourrier-Lacroix, and Jamis Paulson of Turnstone Press.

See what I mean by a headless cover?

matchmaker

3-2Book Fair

Tables and tables and tables of local authors and publishers scattered around the second floor, with prize draws every hour! From 11 am to 4 pm.

number-4   Colour & Create

Anishinaabe artist Jackie Traverse will be showcasing her brand new Indigenous colouring book, Sacred Feminine. Colouring sheets will be available to try out. From 11 am to 4 pm in Wii ghoss.

sacred

number-5-handwritten     Book Club Corner

We know you’re always searching for good book club picks and we’ve got titles your group will love (or love to discuss, at any rate)! Plus, enter to win a set of 10 copies of The Opening Sky and an appearance by its author Joan Thomas at your book club!

opening

 And Even More Books!

Just in case you weren’t already staggering under armloads and lists of to-read books, there’s still more! Displays of recommended reads on different themes will be stashed throughout the second floor, including a selection of titles personally curated (so fancy) by our Writers-in-Residence, Christine Fellows and John K. Samson!

wir2016image.jpg

See you Saturday, November 19 all over the second floor, Millennium Library, 251 Donald Street!!

 

 

 

“Seize the Night” at Nuit Blanche

owl

Nuit Blanche owl logo

Calling all night owls!

Nuit Blanche is a free all-night exploration and celebration of contemporary art. In Winnipeg, the event has been held annually since 2010 as part of Culture Days, and attracts thousands of people to St. Boniface, Downtown and the Exchange District.

Nuit Blanche takes place this Saturday, October 1, from dusk to dawn and the Winnipeg Public Library is excited to be taking part! Visit two of our  libraries under the stars for an evening that harkens back to childhood crafts, library visits, and the joys of being read-aloud to.

Millennium Library Park
7-11 pm

Lighten up your Nuit Blanche with story time for adults, a lantern creation station, and a library lounge.

  • Library lounge and creation station open all evening
  • Story time for adults at 8:30 & 10 pm
  • Watch for our roving Book Bike with Writers-in-Residence Christine Fellows and John K. Samson. They’ll be “pedaling” some of their favourite books!

St. Boniface Library
(in the lobby and on Provencher Blvd.)
7-11 pm

Rendez-vous à la Bibliothèque de Saint-Boniface pour une soirée qui vous ramènera à la magie de votre enfance, la création artisanale, les visites à la bibliothèque et la joie d’écouter des histoires.

  • Creation station open all evening
  • Métis stories told in English and French, throughout the evening

Want to know what else is happening during the long night? Pick up a copy of the program at any library, or visit the Nuit Blanche website for an online listing of the dozens of other events and art installations taking place.

Wondering how to get around? The Winnipeg Trolley Company will be available to all art lovers from 6pm to 2am. The familiar big orange trolley and a new additional shuttle will stop at 8 different locations in the three zones (Downtown, Exchange District and St. Boniface).

Not a night owl? Culture Days isn’t just a Saturday night thing; it starts today (Friday, September 30) and goes on through Sunday, October 2. You’ll find something fascinating to check out!

Danielle

What’s New in the Local History Room

Electric display LH

It’s time to have a look at what is new in the Local History Room.

First, come and learn about the history of electric power in Manitoba. The new display set up in the room, through collaboration with the Manitoba Electrical Museum which has loaned artifacts and historical photographs, illustrates this fascinating aspect of our history.

While there, take some time to browse and explore some of the new titles in our collection:

Cover image for Andy De Jarlis : the life and music of an old-time fiddler

Andy De Jarlis: The Life and Music of an Old-time Fiddler by Joe Mackintosh is the story of Andy de Jarlis (1914 – 1975), a successful Métis fiddler and composer who came from a long line of fiddlers and musicians. Though his name may not be familiar to many today, he is credited as having kept Métis fiddling music alive just in time to see a resurgence in today’s music scene. The book also describes the hot spots for live folk music and dancing in Winnipeg from the mid-1950s onward where Andy played on his way to national fame.

Cover image for The ballad of Danny Wolfe : life of a modern outlaw
The Ballad of Danny Wolfe: Life of a Modern Outlaw by Joe Friesen is a much tougher read, which starts with one of the most famous prison breakouts in recent Canadian history, perpetrated by a man some would come to see as a living symbol of a sad legacy. Through 24 chronological chapters, the author traces the early years of Daniel Wolfe’s life: from his birth in Regina to his mother Susan Creeley, a First Nations woman marked by the residential school system; to his first brush with the law at the age of four and then his subsequent arrests; to the birth of the Indian Posse in 1989 – the Aboriginal street gang in Canada that would eventually claim the title of the largest street gang in North America with over 12,000 members (from BC to Ontario, and even Texas, Oklahoma, and Arizona) and Danny at the helm; to Danny’s death in 2010.


Diagnosed with a rare cancer in 1994, Tefs spent the next 20 years coping with this new reality while raising a family, writing acclaimed works of fictions, battling cancer, and cycling. Wayne Tefs is the “Dead Man on a Bike,” his posthumous follow-up memoir to Rollercoaster: A Cancer Journey. Riding throughout Manitoba and parts of Europe was the author’s way of dealing with “the wound,” and provided space and  time for reflections that he shares with the reader.

Cover image for Solving poverty : innovative strategies from Winnipeg's inner city
In Solving Poverty: Innovative Strategies from Winnipeg’s Inner City, Jim Silver, a scholar actively engaged in anti-poverty efforts in Winnipeg’s inner city for decades, offers an on-the-ground analysis of complex and racialized poverty. Silver focuses particularly on the urban Aboriginal experience, and describes a variety of creative and effective urban Aboriginal community development initiatives, as well as other anti-poverty initiatives that have been successful in Winnipeg’s inner city, especially in regards with subsidised housing.


Often under-valued, under-recognized and under-appreciated, support units are seen as less “glamorous” than infantry or armoured units when it comes to military reading, and yet their role is no less essential. Bruce Tascona’s book United in Effort: Manitoba Combat Service Support History, 1870 to 2015 is the first publication to undertake a study of the integral role of logistics and training support in military operations with a specific focus on Manitoba service support units domestically and overseas. These include transporting troops and supplies as well as medical, dental, pay, postal, provost and veterinary services. The book follows the history of these units in Manitoba from the Riel Rebellion to Afghanistan tracing the development and growing importance of logistics in modern warfare.


He has dangled by his toes over a hundred hungry alligators in Florida, been buried alive in India, and jumped from a plane wearing a straightjacket in Japan; escape artist Dean Gunnarson doesn’t shy away from a challenge. The book Dean Gunnarson: The Making of an Escape Artist by Carolyn Gray explores the Winnipeg-born entertainer’s career from its beginning. It describes how after surviving leukemia as a child, his friendship with fellow cancer patient Philip Hornan inspired him to attempt a series of stunts culminating in a near-fatal submerged coffin act on the banks of the Red River that propelled Gunnarson to stardom.

Come and check it out!

  • Louis-Philippe

Beyond Anne’s Diary

Diary Young GirlI have a vivid memory of being in my local library as a kid and picking up The Diary of a Young Girl (also known as The Diary of Anne Frank). My Mom said to me: “I’m not sure if you should read that. It’s very sad!” She thought it best to shield me from the heartbreak of Anne’s story for just a little bit longer. Fast-forward about 15 years and I was asked to be one of the tour guides for the travelling exhibit currently at Millennium Library – Anne Frank: A History for Today. At this point, I had seen the play multiple times and even visited the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, but I still hadn’t done the diary justice.

So, I just recently read the famed book and of course my Mom was right, it is a heartbreaking story! Most people know what happened to Anne, her family, and the six million other Jewish people the Nazis systematically murdered (not to mention the other groups Hitler persecuted based on ethnicity, ability, sexuality, etc.). It’s a devastating piece of history, but when reading the diary there are moments where you somehow forget how the story ends. Anne’s writing is eloquent and you can’t help but be sucked in by the unexpected humour, glimpses of teenage romance, and Anne’s perpetual charm.

As Anne’s diary is a cultural phenomenon, I was not entirely surprised to find a variety of other books about her life. The following titles take the diary in new directions and cross into different genres. No matter what your age, there is a version of Anne’s story for you. Each of these books can be found at the Winnipeg Public Library, but be sure to keep searching as this is just a fraction of our collection on Anne Frank, the Holocaust, and World War II.

 

Anne Frank MullerAnne Frank: The Biography

In this first biography of Anne Frank, Melissa Müller’s thorough research creates a compelling portrait of Anne’s life. Originally printed in 1998, this book contains interviews with family and friends, as well as previously unpublished letters and documents. A new edition of this biography was released in 2014, full of even more information that has since emerged. These documents, along with the Frank’s family tree and an epilogue by one of the family’s helpers, Miep Gies, shine light on this incredible girl.

 

Anne Frank House BioThe Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography

This biography in graphic novel form is an illustrated account of Anne’s life. New York Times bestselling authors, Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón, seamlessly work Anne’s story into the history of World War II and the Holocaust. The book contains a concise chronology of events in the history of the Frank family – an extremely helpful tool for any reader.

 

Anne Frank Hudson-GoffAnne Frank

This graphic novel by Elizabeth Hudson-Goff focuses on both sides of the attic – life before going into hiding and a glimpse at what her final days in a concentration camp may have looked like. A quick read that can easily be finished in one sitting, illustrations bring a new dimension to this famous story of survival.

 

Anne Frank Poems AgosinDear Anne Frank: Poems

A poetry collection that is a tribute to Anne’s life. In most pieces, Marjorie Agosín holds a conversation with Anne, addressing her courage and curiosity. Poetry, and the dialogue Agosín creates, brings Anne’s narrative to life in a unique way.

 

 

Anne Frank PooleAnne Frank

A beautifully illustrated picture book that relays Anne’s story – from birth to death – to a younger audience. By explaining how the Franks end up in hiding, Josephine Poole provides an introduction to the Holocaust for children that is easy to understand. The story ends on a positive note, with Otto, Anne’s father, receiving her diary after the war. The diary ensures that the rest of the Frank family will live on after their senseless deaths.

 

Anne Frank WorldAnne Frank in the World, 1929-1945

This book is a history in pictures published by the Anne Frank House. While the focus is primarily on the Holocaust, the book is framed by Anne’s story. By continually returning to photos of the Franks, the reader is reminded that the victims of the Holocaust are not just a statistic but are real people.

 

“ANNE FRANK: A HISTORY FOR TODAY” Exhibit and Tours

 

Anne Frank Exhibit

The travelling exhibit has come all the way from the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam! It officially launched on Monday, July 11, at the Millennium Library, where it will run until September 3rd. We encourage everyone to spend some time looking at the beautifully crafted panels.

There are also a number of guided tours available, in English or French, that you can register for by calling 204-986-6489. Each tour will begin in the Carol Shields Auditorium (second floor) and will last up to 90 minutes. Those who want to book group tours for more than 10 people can register by calling 204-986-6458.

  • Stephanie

Are you up for the Go Wild Challenge??

book fly

Starting July 4, the Library is challenging you to EXPAND your reading horizons with the GO WILD! Summer Reading Challenge. Each week we will offer three ways for you to read something you might never have read before. To find the right book for you, browse our shelves or catalogue, check out our displays, and stay tuned to this blog.

For every week you try something new, enter our prize draws at any WPL branch!

Ready? Good! Go!

Here are your challenges for Week 1 – World Week (And, to get you started, some staff picks we think you might like…)

Challenge 1: A book set in South America

b1-3BEL CANTO by Ann Patchett

When terrorists seize hostages at an embassy party, an unlikely assortment of people is thrown together, including American opera star Roxanne Coss, and Mr. Hosokawa–Japanese CEO and her biggest fan.

THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS by Isabel Allende

The Trueba family embodies strong feelings from the beginning of the 20th century through the assassination of Allende in 1973.

WIDE SARGASSO SEA by Jean Rhys

In a prequel to Jane Eyre, Creole heiress Antoinette Cosway lives in Dominica and Jamaica in the 1830s before she travels to England, becomes Mrs. Rochester, and goes mad.

PASTWATCH: THE REDEMPTION OF CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS by Orson Scott Card

In a near future that is not quite ours, a major scientific breakthrough permits historians to view, but not participate in, past events.

THE LOST CITY OF Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by David Grann

Interweaves the story of British explorer Percy Fawcett, who vanished during a 1925 expedition into the Amazon, with the author’s own quest to uncover the mysteries surrounding Fawcett’s final journey and the secrets of what lies deep in the Amazon jungle.

b1-4THE MOTORCYCLE DIARIES: A Journey Around South America by Ernesto (Che) Guevara

A chronicle of the author’s seven-month motorcycle journey throughout South America reveals the beginning of his transformation into a dedicated revolutionary.

WALKING THE AMAZON: 860 Days, One Step at a Time by Ed Stafford

Describes the author’s quest to walk the entire length of the Amazon River, offering details on the effects of deforestation and his encounters with both vicious animals and tribal members with machetes.

 

Staff picks for Challenge 2: A book set in the Middle East

3-2PERSEPOLIS: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi

The great-granddaughter of Iran’s last emperor and the daughter of ardent Marxists describes growing up in Tehran in a country plagued by political upheaval-al and vast contradictions between public and private life.

A TALE OF LOVE AND DARKNESS by Amos Oz

The award-winning author recounts his boyhood in war-torn Jerusalem of the 1940s and 1950s, his mother’s tragic suicide, his decision to join a kibbutz and change his name, and his participation in Israel’s political upheavals.

I AM MALALA: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai

Describes the life of the young Pakistani who survived an assassination attempt and became the youngest nominee for the Nobel Peace Prize.

THE YACOUBIAN BUILDING by Alaa Aswani

The lives of a fading aristocrat, voluptuous siren, devout doorman, secretly-gay editor, roof-squatting tailor, and corrupt politician intertwine in an apartment building in downtown Cairo.

3-3ALIF THE UNSEEN by G. Willow Wilson

A young Arab-Indian computer hacker unearths a secret book of the jinn, a book that may open a gateway to unimaginable power.

DE NIRO’S GAME by Rawi Hage

Follows the lives and choices of two best friends, Bassam and George, caught in Lebanon’s civil war. Both men are desperate to escape Beirut but choose different paths to accomplish their goals.

 

Staff picks for Challenge 3: A book set in Africa

 

2-2RADIANCE OF TOMORROW by Ishmael Beah

A novel of postwar life in Sierra Leone, in which two friends struggle to rebuild their ruined village despite violence, scarcity and a corrupt foreign mining company.

HALF OF A YELLOW SUN by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Re-creates the 1960s struggle to establish an independent republic in Nigeria, following the intertwined lives of the characters through a military coup, the Biafran secession, and the resulting civil war.

THE POISONWOOD BIBLE by Barbara Kingsolver

The lives of a fierce evangelical missionary and his wife and four daughters begin to unravel after they embark on a 1959 mission to the Congo.

2-1THIRTY GIRLS by Susan Minot

Forced to commit unspeakable atrocities after being abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army, Ugandan teen Esther struggles to survive and escape.

ROAD TRIP RWANDA: A Journey Into the New Heart of Africa by Will Ferguson

Ferguson travels deep into Rwanda with friend Jean-Claude Munyezamu, who had escaped just before the genocide, where they discover a country reborn.

LONG WALK TO FREEDOM by Nelson Mandela

The leader of South Africa’s anti-apartheid movement chronicles his life, including his tribal years, his time spent in prison, and his return to lead his people.

 

Happy reading!

  • Erica

 

 

Books 2 Eat 2016

17302445942_642f6ce073_oEvery year, the Library Board of the Winnipeg Public Library organizes  “Books 2 Eat,” a fabulous edible art exhibition. This year’s Books 2 Eat will take place on Saturday, April 16 at the Millennium Library.

Love books and/or food? You’re invited to create an edible piece of art! The only two essentials are that your creation must be: made entirely of edible materials, raw or cooked; and fall under this year’s broad theme of “poetry” to celebrate National Poetry Month. How you choose to interpret the rules is part of the fun!

How to Enter
Visit the Books 2 Eat website, fill out an online entry form, and email it to Books2Eat@winnipeg.ca. The deadline to submit an entry form is coming up on Monday, April 11. Of course, your edible creation doesn’t have to be dropped off at the Library until April 15 or 16.

But there’s lots more to enjoy at Books 2 Eat, even if you aren’t tempted to try your hand at edible art.

Think you can hunt down food-related clues through all four floors of the Millennium Library? Kids and teens can pick up a smorgasbord scavenger Hunt sheet at the Children’s Desk and find out! Hand in your answers (right or wrong) by 3 pm and you’ll be entered in a draw for prizes.

From 1 to 2 pm, families can enjoy a delectable story time filled with mouth-watering tales and a pinch of tasty verses – plus a chance to get hands-on and decorate your own delicious cupcake. (Registration required; call 204-986-6488.)

Browse through a buffet of snack-sized displays! Watch cooking techniques demonstrated and try your hand at food-related crafts and activities from 12 to 3 pm.

And, of course, you can feast your eyes on a buffet of Books 2 Eat creations and  enter a draw for a chance to take one of the edible artworks home. Join emcee Chrissie Troy to find out who the scavenger hunt champions and the lucky winners will be.

Still hungry? Check out our website for more details.

Bon appetit!

Danielle

“Secret” Things the Library Can Do for You (Part 1)

 

shh. secret - Young boy with his finger over his mouth

 

Ok, they aren’t really secrets, but there are some things we offer here at the library that may as well be. Often, my family and friends are surprised by something I refer to. Maybe it’s because these aren’t programs that are featured in our bi-monthly newsletter, but services that we always offer. Or maybe we have to work on tooting our own horn. So in the interest of tooting, here are some of things I wish more people knew they could get from us.  There are a ton of these, but I’m going to start by mentioning four, and save the rest for next time.

 

Personalized book recommendations

One thing I wish more people knew about is how much staff LOVE giving book recommendations. It’s not always a quick process, but we love searching out new books for you. Talk to your local library person and see what happens! Side note – we might consult our website or our NoveList service, which you can also access yourself with your library card. You can search for books by appealing terms like “character-driven,” and “suspenseful”.

 

We’re not quiet

ottomancomedy jpgI’m always amused when people assume the library is still a quiet place. I suppose it can be sometimes. But we also host groups socializing, friends meeting up, kids running around and climbing on our animal ottomans and lots of programming in our public areas, like Folk Fest (for adults and kids), Library Out Loud, Comedy Fest, storytelling and more.

 

A spot just for you

All of our 20 locations have comfy armchairs for lounging and tables to work at. We have desks with plugs nearby for laptops and other gadgets. Some areas of the library are busier and noisier and welcome groups. Other sections tend to be quieter. Staff can tell you which are which. Millennium, Louis Riel, Henderson, and Sir William Stephenson Libraries all have Tutorial rooms that are great for small groups, and a large dedicated quiet study room. Check here for more information about booking a room. And of course our much-photographed sunny terrace.

terrace

Bonus tip: You can now tour all of Millennium Library streetview-style! Check out all the little corners you may not have had a reason to visit in person yet:

 

Cheap used books (and free for non-profits!)

All branches have ongoing used book sales where you can pick up A BAG OF BOOKS for $5.60. That’s right. A BAG. Some of these are withdrawn from our collection, but many were donations. All money goes toward new books for the library. So you can load up and help the library at the same time. Also, non-profits can get books for free. It’s true.

booksale

My circle drawing skills need some work!

 

I can’t let you go without reminding you of our worst-kept secret – we are always planning a zillion programs for you. We’re trying lots of things in the spring that we’ve never done before!

More secrets to come! Or for a sneak peek, chat with your local branch and they’ll fill you in.

 

Keep on reading!

– Erica

 

Silent Books: Final Destination Lampedusa

Newscasts around the world have been reporting the plight of refugees fleeing their homelands. These are touching stories of the dangers and challenges faced by families who are searching for a safe place to call home. As refugee families are being welcomed in Canada, there have also been many migrants arriving on the island of Lampedusa, Italy.

Winnipeg Public Library has been offered the unique opportunity to host the international travelling exhibit Silent Books: Final Destination Lampedusa. This collection of travelling books was created as a project by IBBY (International Board of Books for Young people), in response to the waves of refugees from Africa and the Middle East arriving on the Italian island of Lampedusa. The idea was launched in 2013 and included establishing the first library in Lampedusa for the use of local and immigrant children. Over one hundred books from twenty three countries have been gathered for the exhibit. The exhibit has travelled to cities around the world in Italy, Mexico, Austria, and is now in Canada having stops in Vancouver, Edmonton, Toronto, Halifax and finally, Winnipeg.

Silent Books: Final Destination Lampedusa is motivated by IBBY’s belief that every child has the right to become a reader. In choosing to highlight wordless books as the seed collection for the this library, IBBY has assured that reading these books will be accessible to all of the children who use the library without the barriers of age,  individual reading skills, or diversity in language and culture.

Reading and sharing wordless books is a first step to becoming a life-long reader. They tell a story using the universal language of images and art rather than words.  Wordless books can help develop confident readers by developing comprehension skills, learning how to construct a story, analysing the picture, reading and understanding the messages that are woven into the pages and also in developing the imagination. Enjoying wordless books with your children can be an adventure that will soar as far as your imagination takes you.

The exhibit runs at Millennium Library in the Children’s and Teen area from February 9 to March 12.

Activities will run parallel to the exhibit where children can send a postcard to Lampedusa or create a wordless book of their own.

Here are some of my favorite wordless books that are available at WPL to share with you. You can see more at  Goodreads

Sidewalk Flowers by Jon Arno Lawson and Sydney SmithSidewalkFlowers

A little girl collects wildflowers while her distracted father pays her little attention. Each flower becomes a gift, and whether the gift is noticed or ignored, both giver and recipient are transformed by their encounter.  This book is being given to arriving Syrian Refugee families.

 

The Arrival by Shaun TanTheArrival

In a heartbreaking parting, a man gives his wife and daughter a last kiss and boards a steamship to cross the ocean. He’s embarking on the most painful yet important journey of his life- he’s leaving home to build a better future for his family.
ChalkChalk by Bill Thomson

Three children discover a magical bag of chalk on a rainy day.

 

 

The Girl and the Bicycle by Mark PettGirlandtheBicycle

A touching story about a little girl, a shiny bicycle, and the meaning of persistence—with an unexpected payoff.

 


HankFindsanEggHank Finds an Egg by Rebecca Dudley

While walking through the forest, Hank finds an egg on the forest floor. After spotting its nest high up in a tree, he uses his ingenuity to help get the egg home safe and sound, and is joyfully rewarded with newfound friends.

 

Shadow by Suzy LeeShadow

A dark attic. A light bulb. An imaginative little girl.

 

FloraFlamingoFlora and the Flamingo by Molly Idle

Flora and her graceful flamingo friend explore the trials and joys of friendship through an elaborate synchronized dance. With a twist, a turn, and even a flop, these unlikely friends learn at last how to dance together in perfect harmony.

 

The Farmer and the Clown by Marla FrazeeFarmerandtheClown
A baby clown is separated from his family when he accidentally bounces off their circus train and lands in a lonely farmer’s vast, empty field. The farmer reluctantly rescues the little clown, and over the course of one day together, the two of them make some surprising discoveries about themselves—and about life!
Fox's GardenFox’s Garden by Princesse Camcam

One snowy night, a fox loses its way, entering a village. Chased away by the grown ups, Fox takes shelter in a greenhouse. A little boy sees this from his window. Without hesitating, he brings a basket of food to the greenhouse, where he leaves it for the fox. His gift is noticed and the night becomes a garden of new life, nourished by compassion and kindness.

 

Many thanks to the following for bring this exhibit to Winnipeg:

IBBYLogo IICLogo

-Tamara

 

It’s time to get On The Same Page again

This annual project of The Winnipeg Foundation and the Winnipeg Public Library—now in its eighth year!—encourages all Manitobans to read, and talk about, the same book at the same time.

aliceThe book Manitobans chose to read this year is The Evolution of Alice by David Alexander Robinson. David’s novel tells the story of Alice, a single mother raising three young daughters after her abusive ex is jailed. With the help of her best friend, Gideon, she tries to create the best possible life for her family and help them heal from old wounds. When tragedy strikes, Alice is forced to examine her life and her role in the community. Woven together from multiple points of view, the novel shows the interconnection of Alice’s life.

What next? Borrow a copy of The Evolution of Alice from the library in print, ebook, accessible formats (via NNELS) or buy one at a local bookstore. We’ll also be distributing free copies through Manitoba public libraries and other organizations, so keep your eyes open.

Already read the book? Then watch our website (OnTheSamePage.ca) for more information—don’t forget to count yourself in the Reader’s Tally—and come check out these upcoming events!

On The Same Page Events

Join us Thursday, February 11, at 7 p.m. in the Marpeck Commons area of Canadian Mennonite University (2299 Grant Ave.) to hear a reading by David Robertson and to create paper airplanes carrying your own wishes or messages of hope – an activity inspired by The Evolution of Alice.

Deconstructing Alice
How does a group of linked short stories become a novel? David and his editor Warren Cariou will talk about the process of creating a coherent mosaic from narrative fragments. Hosted by Charlene Diehl.
McNally Robinson Booksellers (1120 Grant Ave.)
Thursday, March 10: 7-8 pm

On The Same Page Windup
Readings and insights from the writer’s life from David and other celebrated On The Same Page authors including Beatrice Mosionier (In Search of April Raintree), Joan Thomas (Reading by Lightning), and Katherena Vermette (North End Love Songs). Four stellar authors all in one venue!
Millennium Library
Carol Shields Auditorium
Thursday, April 14: 7-8 pm

Danielle

Full of Beans

 “Red beans and ricely yours.” Louis Armstrong loved red beans and rice so much he signed his personal letters thus.

2016-Pulses

The lowly bean was raised to super food status when the United Nations declared 2016 The International Year of Pulses. Beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas are the key to eradicating world hunger and addressing chronic health conditions such as heart disease, obesity and diabetes. Not only do pulses improve our overall health, they are also economical. According to The Bean Institute the average cost per serving of lentils is 8 cents as opposed to $1.14 for lean ground beef.

Pulses have the lowest carbon footprint of any protein source. Reduced reliance on meat consumption results in decreased greenhouse gas emissions and water usage. The water footprint required to produce a kilogram of beef is 18 times higher than the water required for a kilogram of pulses. Growing pulses improves soil health and reduces the need for fertilizer.

A  study by Dr. Peter Zahradka, a lead investigator into the health benefits of pulses, will look at a reduced risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as a reduced risk of diabetes due to the promotion of healthy blood sugar levels, reduced cholesterol and blood pressure through the consumption of pulses.

pulsepostpic

The gluten free humble legume is high in fibre, low in fat and packed with nutrients like folate, potassium  and iron. Typically Manitobans eat less than one third of cup of pulses per week. A healthy benchmark is ½ cup a day. Check out these cook books at WPL or look for more recipes online through  www.manitobapulse.ca.

veganbeansVegan Beans from Around the World – Adventurous recipes for the most delicious nutritious and flavourful bean dishes ever.

 

 

 

spillingbeans  Spilling the Beans- cooking and baking with beans everyday

 

 

 

The “Bean Team” from Manitoba Pulse and Soybean Growers will make a guest appearance at the Fort Garry Library on Tuesday February 2 at 6:30 pm to talk about the benefits of  beans and other pulses and to demonstrate some recipes. Call 204 986 4918 to register for this free event.

And join the Pulse Pledge, a global movement to commit to eating nutritious, affordable pulses once a week for 10 weeks.

“Red beans and ricely yours,” Jane