Tag Archives: Andrew @ WPL

Green it. Mean it.

Just in time for the week of Earth Day, Winnipeg Public Library is introducing a new series Green it.  Mean it.  The goal of the series is to offer practical advice you can use to make better choices for the environment.  How can I make my home more energy efficient? What renewable energy options, like solar, are available and how can I use them at home?  How to xeriscape your yard? We’ll also be talking about zero waste living and green friendly food choices.

To kick off the Green it.  Mean it. series, we’re running four programs in May and June.

 

Everything You Need to Know About Electric Vehicles

Learn what’s available, what’s coming, which one is right for you, and where and how to charge it up! Presented by Robert Elms of the Manitoba Electric Vehicle Association.

River Heights Public Library
Thursday, May 23 6:30–7:30pm
Call 204-986-4936 to register
Or register online

Henderson Public Library
Monday, June 17 6:30–7:30pm
Call 204-986-4314 to register
Or register online

 

Vermicomposting

Learn to compost indoors with vermicomposting. Use red wriggler worms to change household organic material into nutrient rich worm manure. Fertilize and enrich garden and potting soil while reducing the amount of waste you send to the landfill. Presented by Green Action Centre Winnipeg.

Munroe Library
Thursday, May 23 6:30–8pm
Call 204-986-3736 to register
Or register online

Osborne Library
Monday, June 10 6:30–8pm
Call 204-986-4775 to register
Or register online

 

Bees and Urban Beekeeping

Bees are critical for agriculture and a healthy ecosystem. Learn about bee biology and behaviour, what to plant to help the local bee population, and what to consider if wanting to get into beekeeping yourself. Presented by Beeproject Apiaries.

St. Vital Library
Tuesday, May 14 7–8pm
Call 204-986-5628 to register
Or register online

 

Low Waste Living

Could you live your life without producing any trash? That’s the goal of being a zero-waster! Discover more about this low-waste lifestyle from people who actually practice it. You will learn how to make less garbage and find out which resources are available to help. Presented by Zero Waste Manitoba.

St. James Library
Tuesday, June 4 6:30–8pm
Call 204-986-3424 to register
Or register online

You can also register in person at your nearest library!


Don’t forget to check out our upcoming info guide, Green Choices.  The guide will provide you with information from print and online resources to help you make environmentally sound choices.  You’ll find things like:

 

Climate of Hope by Michael Bloomberg and Carl Pope

 

 

Climate of Hope: how cities, citizens and businesses can save the planet

By Michael Bloomberg and Carl Pope

 

 

Climate Justice by Mary Robinson

 

 

 

Climate Justice: hope, resilience and the fight for a sustainable future.

By Mary Robinson

 

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power by Al Gore

 

 

An Inconvenient Sequel: truth to power: your action handbook to learn the science, find your voice and help solve the climate crisis.

By Al Gore

 

 

drewblog4

 

Bikes vs Cars a documentary found on our Kanopy streaming service.

 

 

Look for the guide in June and keep your eyes open for more green stuff.

~ Drew

 

Start with astronomy

I can think of no better way to start a blog post about the night sky than to quote The Friendly Giant: “look up, look wayyyyy up”. Stars, planets, moons, constellations and galaxies are all things to search for and observe in the night sky.

The warmth of summer is a great time to start learning and you don’t need a massive telescope. A good pair of binoculars will reveal a number of objects that your unaided eye can’t see and they are a great way to learn how to navigate the night sky.

The Winnipeg Public Library has a great selection of resources to help you. I’ve selected a variety of books and television shows from our print and online streaming collections to get you started.  Just for fun, I’ve thrown in some stuff by Neil de Grasse Tyson and the potential for life in the Universe.  Excelsior!

SETI: Astronomy as a Contact Sport with Jill Tarter
This is a documentary about the organisation SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence). Among many goals, SETI wants to try to answer the question “are we alone?” SETI does this by listening for signals that could originate from extraterrestrial civilizations in other parts of the universe.

These four videos are part of a 12 episode series called Our Night Sky which examines different objects in the sky such as planets, stars, constellations and where they can be found in different seasons:

Inexplicable Universe: Unsolved Mysteries with Neil deGrasse Tyson
Join Neil deGrasse Tyson as he discusses what we know and don’t know about the universe. Explore new areas of research and knowledge.

Season One of Life in Our Universe with Laird Close
This 24 episode series discusses a variety of topics such as astrobiology (the study of biology beyond earth), extraterrestrial intelligence, does life exist beyond earth, different environments life could evolve in and how to terraform a planet.

The Astronomy Book by David Hughes offers a concise history of the some of the most important events in astronomy, cosmology and physics. Each topic covered is easy to read and each section uses flowcharts and graphics to help present a clear picture of new discoveries and important developments.

Wonders of the Night Sky you Must See before you Die: the Guide to the Most extraordinary Curiosities of our Solar System by Bob King
You’ve read the 1000 places you must see before you die or 1000 songs you must listen to before you die. Now there’s a list for astronomy.  Bob King introduces you to 57 sights in the night sky and provides information on how to see these objects using your eyes, binoculars and telescopes.

The Night Sky Atlas: the Moon, Planets, Stars and Deep Sky Objects by Robin Scagell
The Night Sky Atlas offers excellent maps of the sky to help you locate constellations, stars, planets and more. Clearly laid out, it is quick and easy to use. This book is a great addition for anyone starting out in astronomy.

Astronomy: a Self-Teaching Guide by Dinah Moche
Essentially an introductory course in astronomy, this is a terrific and thorough book to grab if you want to learn more than just the locations of different sights in the sky. The eighth edition has links to online resources such as fantastic color images. The book also features tests at the end of each section to help reinforce what you’ve learned.

Learning about and navigating the night sky can be an enjoyable and fulfilling pastime; I hope you find these suggestions helpful and take a look. If you’re looking for an upcoming astronomical event that is easy to see, try the Perseid meteor shower in August. The shower peaks on the nights and early mornings of August 11-12 and 12-13. You don’t need anything but your eyes!

Andrew

Remembrance Day

November is a time to remember those who have lost their lives in service to their country and every year in November, at ceremonies across the country, we hear recitations of In Flanders Fields by Canadian John McCrae. Poetry, especially during the Great War, has been a way of expressing sadness and feelings for lost friends, loved ones and colleagues.

John McCrae penned some of the most familiar and powerful lines of war poetry that we Canadians know.  However, McCrae was not the only citizen or soldier to find expression in poetry during and after the Great War.  Other Canadians such as Marjorie Pickthall, Frederick George Scott and Robert Service also penned poems that evoke strong feelings in us today.  Besides Canadian poets, other powerful poetry was written by Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, Robert Graves, Isaac Rosenberg and Philip Larkin.

I do not have the skill and words to describe the horrors of war that the men and women of our armed forces faced during two catastrophic world wars.  Instead, I have chosen a selection of poems for you to read.

Andrew

Dolce et Decorum Est
Wilfred Owen

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.
Gas! Gas! Quick, boys! – An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime . . .
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.
If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
Pro patria mori.

Marching Men
By Marjorie Pickthall

Under the level winter sky
I saw a thousand Christs go by.
They sang an idle song and free
As they went up to calvary.

Careless of eye and coarse of lip,
They marched in holiest fellowship.
That heaven might heal the world, they gave
Their earth-born dreams to deck the grave.

With souls unpurged and steadfast breath
They supped the sacrament of death.
And for each one, far off, apart,
Seven swords have rent a woman’s heart.

Dreamers
Siegfried Sassoon

Soldiers are citizens of death’s grey land,
Drawing no dividend from time’s to-morrows.
In the great hour of destiny they stand,
Each with his feuds, and jealousies, and sorrows.
Soldiers are sworn to action; they must win
Some flaming, fatal climax with their lives.
Soldiers are dreamers; when the guns begin
They think of firelit homes, clean beds and wives.

I see them in foul dug-outs, gnawed by rats,
And in the ruined trenches, lashed with rain,
Dreaming of things they did with balls and bats,
And mocked by hopeless longing to regain
Bank-holidays, and picture shows, and spats,
And going to the office in the train.

Two Fusiliers
Robert Graves

And have we done with War at last?
Well, we’ve been lucky devils both,
And there’s no need of pledge or oath
To bind our lovely friendship fast,
By firmer stuff
Close bound enough.

By wire and wood and stake we’re bound,
By Fricourt and by Festubert,
By whipping rain, by the sun’s glare,
By all the misery and loud sound,
By a Spring day,
By Picard clay.

Show me the two so closely bound
As we, by the red bond of blood,
By friendship, blossoming from mud,
By Death: we faced him, and we found
Beauty in Death,
In dead men breath.

To find more poems by any of these poets, please consider the following books:
The War Poets,  Robert Giddings

Selected Poems, Wilfred Owen

Selected Poems, Robert Graves

After Every War: Twentieth Century Women Poets, Eavan Boland

Anthem for Doomed Youth: Twelve Soldier Poets of the First World War, Jon Stallworthy

Poets of World War II, Harvey Shapiro