Tag Archives: Lori @ WPL

DIY Book Stack Management

I can never read all the books I want.
Sylvia Plath

I love books, the more the better. The mere thought of being somewhere without something to read is enough to make me break out in a cold sweat. Fortunately this doesn’t happen very often, given where I work and the size of my book collection. Sometimes, though, too much of a good thing is simply too much. My TBR (To Be Read) book stacks, reading lists, wish lists and downloads can and do get out of hand at times. I’ve discovered a few tricks that work for me to wrestle my TBR to a manageable size, at least until the next time it gets out of control.

I’ve spent many fascinating hours in the world of the Seven Kingdoms, created by George R. R. Martin. But at a certain point I simply had had enough, and I have yet to finish reading the entire series. I might be the only fan out there who isn’t concerned with when the next book comes out, but I refuse to feel guilty. Alright, maybe I feel a little guilty, but not enough to continue the series until I’m ready for it.

Ian Rankin’s Rebus character is one of my favorite literary detectives, to the point where I found myself craving Irn Bru, bacon butties and brown sauce on chips, even though I’m not entirely clear on what brown sauce is. I mourned the end of Rebus’s career when Ian Rankin retired him, but I still appreciated all of the great writing. When Rebus returned I found I didn’t have much interest in reading his new stories. I’m sure that the quality of the writing is excellent, I mean we are talking about Ian Rankin, after all, but sometimes you just have to let a character go. That’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it, at least for now.

Apples and Robins by Lucie Felix is an amazing picture book that uses die cut shapes to reveal a surprise on each page. It’s absolutely beautiful, but I’ve never been tempted to find more books by this author. This stems partly from a fear of being disappointed, and partly as a means to stop myself from adding yet another book to my stack.

 

The first time I read Rainbow Rowell’s book Eleanor and Park I was enchanted, and I only became more enchanted each time I read it. Despite all of the tempting reviews and recommendations I’ve gotten about her other books I haven’t rushed to read them. Sometimes it’s good to wallow in the undiluted greatness of one book for awhile before picking up another one by the same writer. I have read several of her books, and plan on reading everything that she writes, but for me having a bit of a hiatus lets me savor the stories that much more deeply. Plus it keeps the book stack just a wee bit shorter.

Other book stack management methods that work for me are suspending my holds, editing the lists on my library account, clearing out my Goodreads lists, and periodically moving the stacks of books in my house from one room to another. Somehow, even with all of this, I never seem to have enough time to read everything that I want, but on the bright side I never have to worry about running out of books, either.

-Lori 

Random Acts of Reading

Expose yourself to as much randomness as possible.

Ben Casnocha

Reading a series (in order of course) is an experience like no other. It plunges you into an ongoing saga that can take you from one side of a world to another, over the edge and back again. There’s a progression and a certain left brain logic to following the suggested reading order that my list-loving side really enjoys. But what about just reading anything? No logic, no order, just a right brain intuitive leap into whatever looks good at the time. I do that too, generally after finishing a long series of books. Theories differ as to how much influence the left and right side of the brain have on personality and decision-making, but I like to think that I’ve achieved a state of relative balance between the two.

Throughout the winter I pretty much lived and breathed Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series. I read through them all, some of them more than once, listened to them on audiobooks, and talked about them with anyone who would listen. After a time I finished with the series, much to the relief of my nearest and dearest, who were thrilled to have a conversation that didn’t contain references to the brilliance of Sir Terry. Having come from a prolonged period of regulated reading I was ready for some more random book choices, which led me to a right brain dominated summer reading season of picking up whatever looked good at the time.

I guess I wasn’t ready to leave the whole fantasy by British authors experience, because my next reading choice was the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy trilogy which comes in five parts, by Douglas Adams. Cruising through the universe with Arthur, Ford Prefect, and his semi-half cousin Zaphod Beeblebrox was the Pan-Galactic Gargle Blaster my brain needed to move on from the Discworld.

 

After my around the galaxy tour I was ready for something more down to earth, which led me to the books by James Herriot which are about as far from fantasy as you can get. The stories James tells about his time as a rural vet in Yorkshire are sweet and engaging, and somehow make shivering in freezing cold to deliver a lamb and being up to your ankles in manure seem appealing. The television series has breath-taking views of the Yorkshire countryside, and the actors do a good job of transitioning the characters from the page to the screen without losing the charm of the original.

 

I haven’t gone on any road trips yet this year, but reading Sparrow Hill Road by Seanan McGuire made me glad that I was staying home. The main character, Rose, is the source for the urban legend of the Phantom Prom Date. She was tragically killed in an car crash on her way to the dance, and now travels the highways and byways as a ghost, saving those who she can from suffering the same fate she did. This paired nicely with the Supernatural binge I was on, although I think that Sam and Dean Winchester would probably have had a different reaction to Rose than I did.

 

I moved from the open road to underground caverns for my next random bit of reading. A World Below by Wesley King is the story of a group of students on a field trip to the Carlsbad Caverns when an earthquake suddenly traps them underground. But the dangers the students face go beyond surviving a natural disaster. There’s an entire civilization living deep in the caverns, and they aren’t happy about having visitors from the world above.

 

Left brain or right brain, random or planned, what’s your next act of reading going to be?

 

-Lori

 

Small Books, Big Ideas

Notice the small things. The rewards are inversely proportional.
Liz Vassey

War and Peace. Moby Dick. The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Encyclopedia Britannica. These are all big books, figuratively and literally. They contain thousands of pages and millions of words, not to mention taking up a big chunk of space on a shelf. Even in eBook form these are behemoths, weighty tomes in every sense of the word. People have even written books about reading these books, like A. J. Jacobs, a very ambitious fellow who tried to read the entire Encyclopedia Britannica in one year. But is this the only way? Does a book have to be big to have enormous influence? Not always. Sometimes it’s the smallest books that can convey the biggest ideas, take to a special time and place or give you enough information to guide you on your path through life.

While self-described as a bear of very little brain, Pooh has a way of summing up complex concepts in a few elegant words. On the surface his comments may be about honey and teatime, but you could do far worse than to apply his sage advice in all situations.

Nobody can be un-cheered with a balloon.

Oxford University is famous worldwide for the depth and breadth of the education and erudition of its professors and students who can spend years, if not their entire lifetime writing extremely long, and in some cases, exceedingly long winded, treatises on any subject under the sun. But reading something from the Very Short Introductions series will give you insights and arguments on a wide variety of subjects, with time left over for other things.

 Voltaire said: “I wholly disapprove of what you say-and will defend to the death your right to say it.”

There have been many re-tellings of the classic story of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter, but to my mind there will never be a more charming and captivating version than the original, which is just the right size for a cozy cuddle with a little one.

After a time he began to wander about, going lippity – lippity – not very fast, and looking all around.

Science and philosophy are topics that each have immense ideas and concepts. When you put the two together in a small book the size of the ideas that are communicated is incalculable.

How do we reconcile the advantages of science with its perils?

Meditation and motion are a huge part of my life, and this little book has expanded my horizons beyond calculation. Any book by Thich Nhat Hanh has paradigm altering ideas, but this one is easy to tuck into your pocket.

Walking in mindfulness brings us peace and joy, and makes our lives real.

Sometimes big books are necessary to communicate big ideas, but in my experience it’s not the size of the book that matters, it’s the size of the ideas inside the book.

Lori

 

 

 

 

 

Doin’ the Dewey

Ben wished the world was organized by the Dewey decimal system. That way you’d be able to find whatever you were looking for…
Brian Selznick

364.1523, 641, 822.33, 910

Or, to express this in words, true crime, cookbooks, Shakespeare and travel essays. These are just a small random sample of the multitude of subjects and information you can find using the Dewey Decimal system. Doin’ the Dewey is second nature, something that I’ve used for most of my life to find what I’m looking for.

The human brain is hardwired to categorize and sort data. Sometimes it’s in long term memory, sometimes it’s in short term, sometimes it’s an image and sometimes it’s an aroma. Scientists are working on ways to map how the brain works, to try and discover how the brain organizes and retrieves all of the data that comes our way, and they’ve come up with some amazing conclusions.

Going to a library is a bit like being inside an enormous brain. Libraries house an astonishing amount of information, and just as with our brains we need to be able to retrieve anything at any time as quickly and as accurately as possible. The retrieval system in a library also needs to be replicated in varied locations and expand as needed to accommodate new materials, which is where the Dewey Decimal system comes in. Every subject and classification has its own number, and is the same in every public library in Winnipeg, so you can transfer the knowledge from one location to the next and still find what you’re looking for. It even works for any format – print, audio or video.

Still not feeling confident that you too can do the Dewey? Here’s a quick and easy overview of the Dewey classifications and what you can find where:

000 – Computer Science and Information

In this section you can also find information on UFOs, Bigfoot, the paranormal, the Guinness Book of World Records, books of lists, and so much more.

 

 

 

 

100 – Philosophy and Psychology

Here you’ll find selections ranging from the Platonic method to the latest insights on the human mind. The ideologies may conflict, but on these shelves everyone lives in harmony.

 

 

 

 

300 – Social Sciences

This section is home to money management, true crime, fairy tales, politics and the environment, to name but a few of the fascinating subjects on these shelves.

 

 

 

 

 

400 – Language

If you’re into grammar, need a dictionary or want to learn a new language this is the place to go.

 

 

 

 

500 – Science

Biology, chemistry, astronomy, natural sciences, mathematics,  if it’s part of the known or theoretical universe you’ll find it here.

600 – Technology

Whether you want to fix a bicycle, plant a garden, raise a pet, cook something new, or find a new way to connect with your child you’re sure to discover something in this section.

 

 

 

 

700 – Arts and Recreation

Crafters, painters, decorators, knitters, musicians and sports fans all come together in one section.

 

 

 

 

800 – Literature

Poetry, prose, humor and essays all  in one easy to find location. You’ll find some of the most beautiful and timeless literary works of all time, and guides to help you interpret them.

 

 

 

 

900 – History and Geography

Whether you want to travel back in time, or get the latest recommendations before your journey across the globe, the materials you find in the 900s will guide you on your way.

 

 

 

 

If’ you’re interested in an in -depth look at the Dewey classifications, stop by the Millennium Library and take a look at the Dewey decimal classification and relative index or the DDC as it’s affectionately known. These four volumes encompass every detail and decimal point in the world according to Dewey, and if it’s not in there then it’s quite likely whatever you’re after doesn’t exist.

 

 

 

 

See how easy doin’ the Dewey can be?

-Lori

One Thing Leads to Another

So many books, so little time.
― Frank Zappa

There are a lot of great things about working in a library, but one of the best is having someone recommend a book. There’s nothing like the expression on someone’s face when they hand you a book and open the conversation with: “You have to read this!” The one thing that’s better than reading a good book is talking with someone about a good book, and the conversation only gets better when you don’t have to worry about spoilers.

For the past couple of years there has  been an annual Reader’s Salon blog post with submissions by library staff for the best book they’ve read that year. While I always enjoy reading the blogs my co-workers write, I look forward to this particular post with special anticipation. I make a point of prioritizing reading as many of the titles as I can, and I find that reading just one book from that list leads me into all sorts of intriguing directions. With that in mind, I wanted to share a few of the books I’ve discovered after reading some of the selections from the post Our Gift to Readers, posted December 7 2016.

After reading All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr I picked up The Cellist of Sarajevo by Stephen Galloway. This book also personalizes the tragedy of war by telling the story of civilians that must try to survive in a war zone. Don’t make the mistake that I did of reading this book in a public place. I had a very kind and concerned stranger ask me why I was crying, and in response all I could do was hold up the book.

Light                                                        cellist

Many of you know Katherena Vermette through her book of poems, North End Love Songs. I loved her novel The Break, as well, but did you know that she’s also written some terrific books for children? Each one has a unique message for young and not so young readers alike. The one that is the mostly timely for this time of year is The First Day. It’s part of the Seven teaching stories series, and tells the story of Makwa, a little boy who who is frightened about starting a new school. Not all of us have to worry about facing the first day of school anymore, but all of us need to find courage in dealing with scary situations.

As an Ethan Hawke fan from way back I was so pleased to discover that in addition to his many other talents he can also write. Rules for a Knight led me to try and find other books about leading a more examined, mindful life. I found How to Walk and other books by Thich Nhất Hạnh to be tremendously helpful in this endeavour. As in Ethan Hawke’s book, the principles are stated and illustrated in a way that stays in your mind and gets into your heart.

rules                                                         how to

I did my best to read Every Heart a Doorway slowly, to make the magic last as long as possible, but like all stories it did eventually come to an end. However, after finishing it I was delighted to discover that Seanan McGuire has written a number of other books, and that there’s a sequel to Every Heart a Doorway, Down Among the Sticks and Bones. Seanan McGuire also publishes under the name Mira Grant, but that’s a topic for another blog.

downevery

 

This isn’t a complete list by any means, as I’m still in the midst of reading and waiting to read a number of the other titles from that post. As always, I’m very curious as to where that will lead me. To paraphrase Bilbo Baggins, it’s a dangerous business to open a book, there’s no telling where you’ll end up.

-Lori

Love it and List it

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The human animal differs from the lesser primates in his passion for lists.  H. Allen Smith

As I’ve said a time or two million before, I love lists. Long, short, alphabetical, chronological, or numerical, pro or con, to do or already completed. If it’s a series of words or concepts written in a column I’m all over it. The saying at my house is “If it’s not on the list it doesn’t exist.” This doesn’t just apply to shopping, packing and chores, it’s an all-encompassing motto that we use on a daily basis, often several times a day.

cd handmaids

handmaid's tale

 

 

 

 

Is it any wonder that I work in a place that’s built around lists? After all, what’s the library catalogue but a list of all of the items at the library? Take something like The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. When you look up the title you’ll see a list of the print books, audio books, book club kits and critical essays. But the fun doesn’t stop there. You can place a hold on any or all of these items, adding them to your holds list. Or you can create a temporary list, so that you can come back to it after you’ve done some more searching. As if that wasn’t enough, you could also add the title to your list of items you want to read or place on hold at some time in the future. For a list lover, life doesn’t get any better than this.

 

Capture

Sometimes it’s good to have a look at someone’s else list, too. When that moment arises, you can always turn to the WPL website. With a quick click on the search catalogue option, you can see what’s at the top of the Globe and Mail and McNally Robinson Bestseller lists. If you’re looking for award winners there are lists for that too, from the Governor General to the Prix littéraire, all connected to that handy list known as the library catalogue.

 

WPL info guidesJust when you thought you’d run out of library lists, we’ve come up with more! Info Guides are lists (there’s that lovely word again) of links created by library staff to library content and websites on all sorts of topics, from Adult Literacy to Science and Technology. The fun thing about the list of Info Guides is that you can search it or rearrange it according to your wishes – alphabetically, by popularity or by the most recent addition. LGBTTQ+ is one of the newest Info Guides in the collection, with a wide range of information, including recommended reads, local support groups and organizations, and online resources. All of the Info Guides are constantly being updated, so there are new things to check out all the time, and, dare I say, add to a list.

 

And, of course, for the truly dedicated list lovers out there, there are entire books dedicated to lists. Where to go, where not to go, best of, worst of, trivia, the selection is almost limitless. If you can think of it, odds are there’s a book out there somewhere listing it.

 

 

 

 

Lori

Be Here Now

 

“In today’s rush, we all think too much — seek too much — want too much — and forget about the joy of just being.” ~Eckhart Tolle

 

Now more than ever it seems that life is ridiculously busy.  The evolution of technology which was intended to make life easier has instead created more problems and accelerated the pace of our lives to a ridiculous, unsustainable velocity.  Just listen to someone yelling at Siri if you don’t believe me. We’ve gotten so advanced that we’re de-evolving in some ways. Instead of using the prefrontal cortex of our brains, which manages planning, emotional reactions and solving problems we’re in a continual state of overdrive on the amygdalla, which governs our fight or flight reactions and our sense of fear.

In the midst of all of this sound and fury seeking tranquility and calm can feel like another source of stress. Finding the perfect time and place to contemplate life is a very tall order, but meditation doesn’t have to be done sitting in the lotus position in an empty room for hours at a time. Meditative practices can be done anytime and anywhere, and the benefits are immediate and amazing.

 

Wherever You Go There You Are   wherever

Each chapter of this book offers a new insight into ways to bring more mindfulness and relaxation into everyday life, even when you’re washing dishes or driving to work. The mindfulness practices Jon Kabat-Zinn  writes about are easy and accessible techniques to bring a little meditation into your daily routine. With a little practice, it becomes as automatic as brushing your teeth, and can have as many health benefits.

 

Taming the Drunken Monkey           taming

Not only does this book have one of the top 10 non fiction book titles of all time (it’s number 8 on my list) it contains an intriguing mix of  Eastern medicine, Western therapies and ancient teachings. William Miklaus has brought these concepts together in a way that speaks to someone looking for physical benefits as well as to someone in search of a more creative way of living.

 

When Things Fall Apart         when

Pema Chordron is the first American woman to become a fully ordained Buddhist monk. She has written numerous books, and is the director of the Gampo Abbey in Nova Scotia. This is a book to be read slowly and in stages, in order to begin to absorb the teachings. I found myself with more questions than answers by the end, but surprisingly it wasn’t frustrating, more like walking through a narrow gap in a hedge to find more beautiful gardens to explore.

 

A Boy Named Queen     

If you’re not looking to contemplate, but still feel flooded and overwhelmed, try checking out A Boy Named Queen. In this children’s book,  Queen teaches a classmate a great lesson about filtering out the cruel words of their schoolmates. Sara Cassidy wrote this book for children, but the message  works just as well for adults who need to take a step back from all of the unwanted input that is constantly bombarding us.

Even if just reading the word meditation immediately fills you with fear and loathing, you can still find some measure of calm and centeredness in our super saturated, super speedy world. Just take a moment, take a breath, and be here now.

-Lori

 

 

 

Long Live the King

Books are a uniquely portable magic.

Stephen King

If you were to walk into almost any library or bookstore, odds are you’ll find most of the shelf space for the K authors is given over to books written by Stephen King. Not only does he tend to write long books, he has written a lot of books. For better or worse, Stephen King has ruled the realm of popular fiction for decades, and he shows no signs of stepping down from his throne anytime soon.

Stephen Kingcarrie officially started his writing career in the late 1960’s, submitting short stories to magazines to supplement his salary as a worker in an industrial laundry. His first novel, Carrie, was published in 1974. It was a runaway success, so much so that Stephen was able to write full time for a living, and he hasn’t looked back since. Although a lot about his life has changed since his first book was published, King still lives in Maine most of the year, he’s still an avid baseball fan, and he’s still giving a lot of people nightmares.

standOne of my favourite bits of King trivia is that he met his wife while they were both working in a university library. Coincidentally, I too first encountered him in a library, although in my case it was my school library, while I was skipping out on an inter-mural floor hockey tournament. Up until then, my only exposure to Stephen King was through the television ad for the movie version of The Shining, which scared the pants off me. To this day I don’t know why I picked up that copy of The Stand, but I did, and I’ve been hooked every since.

itI’m the first to admit that his books aren’t the greatest literature, and I don’t enjoy everything he’s written. But there’s something about the vast stories he’s able to create, and the basic humanity of his characters, that keeps me coming back for more. I prefer his ridiculously long books – It, Under the Dome, and my all-time favourite, The Talisman, to his short story collections.

There’s something about his writing that reminds me of the really gruesome original versions of classic fairy tales, where the world is a dark and scary place filled with wolves that eat grandmothers alive, and wicked queens that demand the hearts of children. In those stories, even though terrible things happened, the characters who were clever, strong and brave came through in the end. These stories were originally told as morality tales, to introduce children to the concept of good and evil. talismanIn that regard, there are a lot of similarities between the stories told by the brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen and Stephen King. The monsters in Stephen King’s books are sometimes supernatural, sometimes human, and horrible things happen to good people, but at the end of the day evil is defeated by the powers of good. Ultimately, I have to turn to Stephen King’s own words to explain why his books appeal to me and to so many other readers: “We make up horrors to help us cope with the real ones.”

-Lori

 

 

 

MYRCA Madness

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March is a month which is special to many people for many reasons. For some, it’s because of St. Patrick’s Day, a time to celebrate their Irish heritage.  For others, it’s all about the basketball, and March Madness. Some years, Easter falls in March, which brings a bunch of reasons to celebrate. For the past 26 years, though, March is also the month when MYRCA voting starts.

And what is MYRCA? I’m so glad you asked. MYRCA or Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award was founded in 1990 as a way to celebrate the International Year of Literacy. Every year since then, the members of the MYRCA committee read and reflect on Canadian fiction that was  written for young people, in order to come up with the annual reading list. This list is available to everyone, and is a great way to promote reading and literacy.

Starting in March, any Manitoba student in grades 5 to 8 who has read at least 3 books on the list is eligible to  vote. These votes then determine which author will become the MYRCA winner for the year. The winning author gets the chance to come to Winnipeg to take part in the awards ceremony. Students from all across Manitoba take part, and it’s a momentous opportunity for students to meet the winning author in person, to ask questions and to present the prize. Past winners have included Kenneth Oppel, David Carroll, Susin Nielsen and Norah McClintock.

Check out this year’s list and you’ll be sure to find something for everyone, from laugh out loud hilarity to non stop hockey action and super scary science fiction.

 

Tank and Fizz: The Case of the Slime Stampede

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Oh no! The cleaning slimes at Gravelmuck Elementary School have escaped and are leaving destruction in their path! Principal Weaver is sure that Mr. Snag, the beloved school custodian, is to blame.  Tank and Fizz, a goblin detective and his troll friend Tank are equally sure that he is innocent and set out to prove it.  Don’t forget to read the pictures in this very funny and somewhat slimy mystery.

 

Last Shot

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Bryan ‘Rocket’ Rockwood has been drafted into the OHL for his skills, not his size. He’s the smallest player on the team, and his teammates and coaches don’t ever let him forget it. Rocket has the determination and the skills to make it in the NHL, but can he earn the respect of the coaches and the other players? Or should he give up his dreams for good?

 

 

The Scorpion Rules

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The world has changed. Cities have been destroyed and empires have crumbled. The planet is now ruled by a supercomputer who has dictated that all of the ruling families must provide a child to be held as a hostage until their 18th birthday to ensure that the world will remain at peace.  Going to war means the death of a hostage.  Duchess Greta thought she was prepared to die, until she meets Elián….

 

There’s a lot more where this came from! You can find these titles, along with all of the others on this year’s list, at any public library or on the Overdrive site. So don’t delay, start reading today! Voting will begin on March 20, 2017, and close at midnight Wednesday, April 12, 2017. All eligible students can vote at the Winnipeg public library of their choice.

Now, when I say MYRCA you say: “Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award!”

Lori

 

Pun and Games

Of puns it has been said that those who most dislike them are those who are least able to utter them.

Edgar Allan Poe

It has also been said that puns are the lowest form of humour, but I disagree. Playing with words and discovering new, albeit perhaps not funny, ways to use them is a great way to experience the joys of language. Like taking a side road or unplanned detour, puns can direct you to a wonderful place you never knew existed. When you make a pun you’re pretty much guaranteed some sort of reaction from the audience, positive or negative, which shows that people are paying attention to your words. Whether you get a groan or a grin, someone has decoded your message. In the best case scenario, people start trading puns back and forth, which can lead to all sorts of punny situations.

Using puns in the titles of mystery novels is a natural fit. Puns are a form of verbal misdirection, and in many mystery novels the detective figure follows many false leads until they discover the truth.

This book will quack you up.

This book will quack you up.

In the end, the criminal gets his just desserts.

In the end, the criminal gets his just desserts.

Puns aren’t just for adults, though. Children who have 20,000 – 30,000 words in their vocabulary by the age of five have an easier time learning to read, and reading is simply interpreting words and their meanings. By exposing children to puns, jokes and wordplay you’re demonstrating the enjoyment that words can bring, and setting them up for a lifelong love of learning. Puns are also a key component to edu-tainment; teaching while entertaining. The other great thing about using puns with children is that they are a completely fresh audience. Even the oldest, stalest pun in your arsenal will be new to them, which guarantees a great response.

Kids just wanna have pun!

Kids just wanna have pun.

do-unto-otters

An alternate title could be: “Do as You Otter.”

The old saying “slow as molasses in January” can be applied to our brain functions. I know for myself that I move a lot more sluggishly in the cold. January is Brain Teaser Month, so to celebrate that why not try some punning yourself, or read something new with some plays on words? It’s a great way to jump start your thinking process, and keep your brain in shape.

pun-also-rises

And, as everyone knows, it sets in the West.

get-thee-to-a-punnery

Or to the Punitentiary

As adults, our neural network isn’t developing at the same rate that it does in children, but it’s still vital to keep exercising our brains. The mind is a muscle that can move the world, but only if it’s kept strong and healthy. Paronomasia, aka puns, are agility exercises for your brain, and you don’t have to be at the gym or work up a sweat with this type of workout.

Puns are an amusing way to pass the time on a long car trip or bus ride, they can be a great icebreaker at a party, or a way to start a speech with a joke. There are many ways and reasons to incorporate puns in your life, and I’ve only mentioned a few here. So what are you waiting for? Get on out there and join in the pun and games!

– Lori