Author Archives: winnipegpublibrary

BookFest a.k.a. Mega Event Book Nerd Day

Did you happen to make it to BookFest last year? Are you wondering what the heck this ‘BookFest’ thing is? Are you just bored and surfing the web? Here’s some info you might find interesting.

[Disclaimer: In my enthusiasm, I have made up a lot of reading-related words for this post.]

BookFest is one of the bookiest days of the year, because it’s the day that WPL and AMBP smoosh together a bunch of readerly things: book tastings (short and sweet book talks), a panel discussion, local publishing houses, local self-published authors, an interactive poetry station, personalized reading advice from WPL experts, and resources just for book clubs. Plus, you know, free book and book-related prize giveaways.

In short, so many things that the only name for it is BookFest!

Some of the books:

bfest1

All the details:

Saturday, November 25 at Millennium Library from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. We’ve taken over the whole second floor.

Panel Talk: The Book Starts Here: 11 a.m. to noon

Take a literary walk through Winnipeg as panelists discuss iconic Winnipeg locations found in books. Charlene Diehl of the Winnipeg International Writers Festival moderates the discussion featuring Winnipeg author Allan Levine.

Book Tastings: Drop in for 30-minute seatings of delicious must-reads. This fun, quick-fire appetizer pairs librarians and avid readers showcasing the best in books.

o                1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. – Life & Death: notable new memoirs & mysteries

o                2 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. – Canada 150+: great reads about our past and present

o                3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. – Genre-bending titles: the best in mixed-genre reads

Book Fair: 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

A book expo where you can explore the best of prairie writing with local publishers: ARP Books, At Bay Press, Les Éditions des Plaines, Fernwood Publishing, Great Plains Publications, J. Gordon Shillingford Publishing, Peanut Butter Press, Rebelight Publishing Inc., Signature Editions, Turnstone Press, and University of Manitoba Press.

Plus, a chance to meet and greet the following authors: Sally Cooper, Lisa Mendis and Chris Ducharme, Anne Mahon, Bartley Kives, Deborah Froese, Harriet Zaidman, Gerald Kuehl, Gabriele Goldstone, Melinda Friesen, Suzanne Costigan, Armin Wiebe, and Janis Thiessen.

Poetry Station: 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Try your hand at “building” a poem by blacking out words on a page. Poet Jennifer Still, the Library’s current Writer-in-Residence, will stop by to demonstrate and assist.

Book Club Corner: 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

A showcase of titles your book club will love, tips for discussion, and information about the Library’s book club kits.
librarian is in
The Librarian is IN!: 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

In a reading slump? Need help finding your next great read? Visit the desk where library staff will be on hand to diagnose your literary condition and prescribe a few titles.

Plus (my favourite part): “spin to win” books and prizes every hour!

Isn’t that an amazing amount of book nerdery? Hope you can join us! (Be there and be square?)

  • The BookFest Team: Danielle, Erica, Aileen, Karen, Michelle, and Kathleen

 

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Remembrance Day

November is a time to remember those who have lost their lives in service to their country and every year in November, at ceremonies across the country, we hear recitations of In Flanders Fields by Canadian John McCrae. Poetry, especially during the Great War, has been a way of expressing sadness and feelings for lost friends, loved ones and colleagues.

John McCrae penned some of the most familiar and powerful lines of war poetry that we Canadians know.  However, McCrae was not the only citizen or soldier to find expression in poetry during and after the Great War.  Other Canadians such as Marjorie Pickthall, Frederick George Scott and Robert Service also penned poems that evoke strong feelings in us today.  Besides Canadian poets, other powerful poetry was written by Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, Robert Graves, Isaac Rosenberg and Philip Larkin.

I do not have the skill and words to describe the horrors of war that the men and women of our armed forces faced during two catastrophic world wars.  Instead, I have chosen a selection of poems for you to read.

Andrew

Dolce et Decorum Est
Wilfred Owen

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.
Gas! Gas! Quick, boys! – An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime . . .
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.
If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
Pro patria mori.

Marching Men
By Marjorie Pickthall

Under the level winter sky
I saw a thousand Christs go by.
They sang an idle song and free
As they went up to calvary.

Careless of eye and coarse of lip,
They marched in holiest fellowship.
That heaven might heal the world, they gave
Their earth-born dreams to deck the grave.

With souls unpurged and steadfast breath
They supped the sacrament of death.
And for each one, far off, apart,
Seven swords have rent a woman’s heart.

Dreamers
Siegfried Sassoon

Soldiers are citizens of death’s grey land,
Drawing no dividend from time’s to-morrows.
In the great hour of destiny they stand,
Each with his feuds, and jealousies, and sorrows.
Soldiers are sworn to action; they must win
Some flaming, fatal climax with their lives.
Soldiers are dreamers; when the guns begin
They think of firelit homes, clean beds and wives.

I see them in foul dug-outs, gnawed by rats,
And in the ruined trenches, lashed with rain,
Dreaming of things they did with balls and bats,
And mocked by hopeless longing to regain
Bank-holidays, and picture shows, and spats,
And going to the office in the train.

Two Fusiliers
Robert Graves

And have we done with War at last?
Well, we’ve been lucky devils both,
And there’s no need of pledge or oath
To bind our lovely friendship fast,
By firmer stuff
Close bound enough.

By wire and wood and stake we’re bound,
By Fricourt and by Festubert,
By whipping rain, by the sun’s glare,
By all the misery and loud sound,
By a Spring day,
By Picard clay.

Show me the two so closely bound
As we, by the red bond of blood,
By friendship, blossoming from mud,
By Death: we faced him, and we found
Beauty in Death,
In dead men breath.

To find more poems by any of these poets, please consider the following books:
The War Poets,  Robert Giddings

Selected Poems, Wilfred Owen

Selected Poems, Robert Graves

After Every War: Twentieth Century Women Poets, Eavan Boland

Anthem for Doomed Youth: Twelve Soldier Poets of the First World War, Jon Stallworthy

Poets of World War II, Harvey Shapiro

Who is Caroline Herschel?

I discovered Caroline Herschel a few years back when she was the inspiration for a Google Doodle. I became obsessed and wanted to know as much as I could about her.  She was most notably the sister of William Herschel, astronomer to King George, and also the man who discovered Uranus.  What most people don’t know is her own contribution to science.  Early in life she contracted typhus; her mother thought this was the end of her life as a woman. Thankfully her father and brother believed there was more for her.  After moving to England she assisted William and even became an astronomer in her own right.  Please do yourself a favor and take a moment to look at the Caroline Herschel Objects.

This got me thinking about other notable women in science. The further down I searched in this rabbit hole, the more I discovered.

Before Caroline (long before) there was Hypatia. Not much is actually known about the life of Hypatia, but of course there doesn’t mean there isn’t speculation!

If you are in the mood for a graphic novel try The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage. A Steampunk graphic novel of Ava Lovelace in an alternative universe using computers to fight crime! Who would say no to that??! Or if you are looking for a more traditional historical novel, the library will soon be getting the forthcoming novel Enchantress of Numbers.

To return to Caroline Herschel, Stargazer’s Sister is a novel that tells her imagined life. From her early days, seeing her first solar eclipse, almost dying from typhus, being rescued by her brother William, and being brought to England where Caroline serves William as his caretaker, assistant, and research partner.  It is only when William announces his plans to marry that Caroline’s life falls apart.

Then I discovered Mary Anning through reading Remarkable Creatures. A fictional account of a Mary Anning, who had a knack for finding fossils. The story begins with Mary being struck by lightning as an infant, and the discovery that would revolutionize paleontology, and shake the religious figures of the time. Mary finds a friend and champion in Elizabeth Philpot. Or, you could read Curiosity: A Love Story by Winnipeg writer Joan Thomas.

I first learned of the women of NASA by watching a video about Margaret Hamilton. Who was Margaret Hamilton? Oh, just the woman who put astronauts on the Moon. Then I kept hearing of this book (and movie) Hidden Figures, the true story of the women who made space travel possible, and won the space race for the USA.

You can also try Rocket Girl, available on Overdrive.

 

 

Women in Science: 50 fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World is new to the library, and I have yet to receive it. I am (not so) patiently waiting for my hold!

Andrea

“Left your house this morning at a quarter after 9”

We lost Gord Downie on October 18, 2017 and, like many Canadians, were heartbroken. We set up red maple leaves in a display case at Millennium Library and invited library customers to share their messages of condolence.

The Tragically Hip:

“This is one of the saddest events ever. The Tragically Hip was the first music I played for my son in utero. We are sorry for your loss. Thank you for sharing him with us.” Deveraux and Savanah M.

 “I saw you live 24 times. What a dream for a kid from Ontario. No matter where I go, the Hip goes too. Thanks for everything. My little girl will have all your albums.” Kate.

 “In the 1990’s, I had a roommate who told me never to touch his cd’s while he was at work. Long story short, I taped all his Hip cd’s. Peace, Love” Mark B.

“Sad news for Canadian music. I was never a Tragically Hip fans but I know what it is like to see a family member go through cancer. Long live Gord Downie. Never forget what he gave Canada through his music.”

His songs inspired us:

”I look up to Gord above and say ‘Hey man thanks.”

“Courage! XOXOXOXOXO”

We loved and admired him:

“Gord put us in the way of beauty.”

“Thank you Gord for all that you did for our country. You will be missed but never forgotten”

“An amazing poet of our time. He will be missed.”

“Gord, you inspired Canadians with your stories and songs. You will be missed.”

“Thank you for telling the story for the lost Aboriginal children”

“R.I.P. Gord. Thank you for all that you have given to this world. Your physical presence will be greatly missed; spiritually you will always be with us.”

“Thank you Music Man.”

“You were loved a lot”

“Rock on.”

He advocated for Indigenous people:

“Thank you Gord Downie for your time to research the life of Charlie Wenjack. Thank you for taking the time to be with his family.”

“Thank you to the Wenjack family for sharing your son’s story. Canada means village and in a village each person cares for each other.”

“Chi-migwech Gord.” Judy and Darryl

“Miguetch. You are awesome and always the best. Fly with the angels, reach the stars.”

“Rest in Peace, Gord. Thank you for advocating for our cause.” From all Indigenous people

We send love to his family:

“Blessings to each of Downie family. For your sharing of Gord has meant much to many.”

“I’m sorry for you guys and my Dad loved your music.”

“Mr. Downie rocked our world. Respect to the family”

“Gord D. You are sorely missed. A true Canadian to the end. God Bless you and your family.”

Wicapi Omani:

“See you on the other side Gord.”

“Gord D. Have a good walk among the stars. P.S. Thank you.”

Photo courtesy of The Globe & Mail

If you are missing him, you are not alone…

(Messages appear as they were written on the leaves.)

-Colette

Dear Diary,

Here I go again. I haven’t given up (yet) on writing regularly in a journal and have that stack of attempts to prove it! (Do I really need to buy a brand new journal when I’m going to try my hand at it again?! I really must stop doing that.)

Anyhow, I recently decided to take this journaling bull by the horns. Before I give up on doing this, I wanted to see if I was missing something. So I went to the library to get some ideas – inspiration – anything! I can’t be the first person who wants to keep a journal, but struggles with sustaining it, right?

So I got on my coat and scarf, because Winnipeg’s winter is on the way, and walked to my neighbourhood library branch. I found out what area these books are in (the non-fiction 808.066 section) and started browsing the shelves. I was quite surprised by the options!

 

The big question that I needed answered was: why would I want to journal when our life is so busy? Well, Let It Out: A Journey Through Journaling by Katie Dalebout talks about how journaling is a great tool for change, clearing your mind, and helping you to get “unstuck”. Similarly, Keeping a Journal You Love by Sheila Bender and Note to Self by Samara O’Shea talk about how journaling is great for self-expression and also helps you focus on the moments in life that beg further exploration. All three books also provided many exercises, prompts, and techniques to use to get started. Nice!

I also needed to find a way to reduce my self-induced pressure to write a page a day. (This is a biggie!) This quote from Leaving a Trace: On Keeping a Journal: The Art of Transforming a Life into Stories by Alexandra Johnson gave me some much needed perspective.

Who knew that our kitchen calendar that is chock full of writing was “silently recording the heroic of the everyday”? I felt hope and pride start to well up inside of me.

But there was one final thing that I needed to know: can I take a different approach to journaling? That’s when I found Start Journaling: An Art Journaling Workbook by Kristy Conlin. It focuses on the visual journal that combines images with words. Add paint! Add collage! With this approach, I can blend writing with colours and images. I can get creative! How cool is that? Another book that shared the visual approach was Artist’s Journal Workshop: Creating Your Life in Words and Pictures by Cathy Johnson.

So I left the library feeling like a weight had been lifted. Gone is my image of the journal as a book with a little lock and key and the feeling of pressure that I need to fill at least one page a day. Nuh-uh – times. have. changed! I’m feeling really good about this. And even better, I already have some ideas for when I write/draw in my journal tomorrow…

Reegan

MYRCA Award Ceremony 2017

On September 29th 2017, the 27th annual MANITOBA YOUNG READER’S CHOICE AWARD was presented to Allan Stratton  for his novel The Dogs.  He was selected by Manitoban children who had read at least three books from the nominated list. Honour book winners were Kevin Sylvester  for his novel Minrs and Kevin Sands for his novel The Blackthorn Key.

Allan Stratton is a prolific Canadian author who has won numerous (and I mean NUMEROUS) awards both in Canada and internationally. As he told the children who came to see him, he worked as an actor for many years, but writing was always his dream. Allan says that his greatest influence in life was his mother, who showed incredible fortitude in leaving his father and his violent abuse while he was a child in the days when such things were frowned upon. The Dogs was directly influenced from these events as is the character of Granny in The Way Back Home. Like Granny, Allan’s mother passed away from Alzheimer’s and he spent much time with her in her twilight, often reading her the dedication page from The Grave Robber’s Apprentice. It reads “For Mom, who took me to the Stratford Shakespeare Festival when I was a kid”. It was a joy and surprise to her every day.

The Dogs is a mystery, a thriller, and a ghost story all rolled into one! Cameron (Cam) and his mother live life on the run from Cam’s abusive father, although the reader is never sure if Cam’s mother is justified in her fear of his return. They move into a creepy old farmhouse and Cam starts seeing the ghost of a little boy who died on the property. Cam begins to wonder if he is losing his mind. However, the barking of dogs that he knows are not there is real to him, and he dives into the mystery of the former homeowners. The true beauty of this novel is how it appeals to all age groups.  Both young and old alike enjoy the suspenseful atmosphere and the surprise ending!

Fun Fact: Allan Stratton names his characters by determining what year they were born, then looking into census records to see what the top names were at the time of his character’s “birth”.

The MYRCA award ceremony was held at the Manitoba Theater for Young People and was attended by over 300 students from Winnipeg and rural Manitoba. The ceremony is an invitation only event and the room was filled to capacity with students who read the nominees and voted for the award. The MYRCA committee was very proud to be able to partner with Thin Air, the International Writer’s Festival, who provided us with theater space and hosted Allan on their “School Stage” events during the week. Allan was able to take in several readings and was very excited to be invited during this incredible event. He told us that Thin Air is one of his favorite festivals in all of Canada!

Lisa Ferguson’s class from Victor Mager School were honoured to host the event. The grade 6, 7, and 8 students did a wonderful job presenting Allan with his award. They also produced a book trailer about The Dogs that Allan loved so much that he asked them if he could use it for his website. The students were very excited to meet him and the buzz backstage before the ceremony was electric. Allan offered the students some sage words of advice regarding nervousness before a show, and his past years of working as an actor clearly showed. Lisa’s class added some fun elements this year, as the students wrote out some trivia questions and the audience was invited to answer them. Participants were gifted with an autographed bookmark!

Allan then read from his new novel The Way Back Home .  Anyone who has a relative with Alzheimer’s will be able to relate to Zoe’s struggle as she watches her Granny deteriorate and eventual placement in a nursing home against her will. With bullies at school and parents who cannot seem to support her in a positive way,  Zoe begins to make some drastic decisions. Will they be able to find the mysterious Uncle Teddy whom everyone claims is dead but Granny insists is still alive? Recently short listed for both the Governor General’s award and OLA’s Red Maple award, The Way Back Home is a must read for any #canlit fan.

After the ceremony, attendees were invited to compete in a scavenger hunt in the afternoon. The talented and amazing (local author) Colleen Nelson organized a scavenger hunt. Students were given a map and clues where they could find hidden pictures of dogs. Once located, the students had to answer a multiple choice question about the nominees from the 2017 list. Students enjoyed running around the Forks on a beautiful fall day and were rewarded with a selection of Canadian books provided by the numerous publishers who support MYRCA every year. Thank you publishers!

Being part of the MYRCA committee is incredibly rewarding and the yearly award ceremony is the highlight of the year. The MYRCA committee is entirely run by volunteers and the ceremony is no exception, so a special thanks must go out to our volunteers – Susan C. who ran the reception table and kept all the classes organized before entry, and Susan from MTYP, the professional and gracious front of house manager who helped Lori and I seat all those excited children. Sabrina was on hand to live tweet from the event (you can follow us on twitter @Myrcaward) plus Tabitha and her students from Red River Collegiate were there to help with the Q and A as well as the book prize give-away and scavenger hunt. Lisa and Colleen made the entire day possible by organizing and putting on the event, which was a memorable day thanks to all their efforts.  We are so grateful that you all volunteered your precious time to help celebrate Allan’s achievement with our young voters. Job well done!

If you and your child/students are interested in participating in MYRCA, there is no cost and it is easy to do. Simply have you child read, or read to them a minimum of three books from the nominated listVoting begins in late March and the winner is announced in early May. Only voters are invited to the ceremony, so get reading so you can join us for all the fun next year!

Colette

Dating Horror Stories

“We’ll find a match for you!”
-every dating site on the Internet

Dating Apps

Dating horror stories. Everyone has at least one, often the first (and usually the last) meeting with that special someone you never, ever want to see again. But just as tragedy is comedy plus time, after a while those epically awful encounters can mellow into an amusing anecdote. For example, back in my mild youth, I went on a date to the Red River Ex. My date was sweet and charming and determined to show me a good time by treating both of us to every single ride, the faster and higher the better. Determined to be a good sport, I ignored my natural inclinations to remain firmly on the ground and went on the rides. Unfortunately for both of us, my date’s generosity also extended to the food trucks, before we went on the rides. I’m sure you can imagine what happened next, and it wasn’t an invitation for a second date. I’ve sometimes wondered what my date’s version of the evening’s events sounds like, but I’ve never dared to find out. Some things should remain a mystery.

But what if you were literally dating someone from a horror story? Given the theory that there’s someone other there for everyone, even some of the most legendary monsters in literature should be able to find their perfect mate and what better way to do that than by joining a dating website? And, if they did, what might their dating profile look like? Read on to see…

draculaby Bram Stoker

  • DOB: 1897 in Rumania
  • Turn Ons: bare necks, formal evening wear
  • Turn Offs: Italian food, watching the sunrise
  • Favorite music: the children of the night… what sweet music they make!
  • Seeking: someone whose love will never die

One date with me will seem like an eternity!

 

henry viii wolfman  by A.E. Moorat

  • DOB: not really sure, but I’ve been around since ancient Egyptian times
  • Turn Ons: the full moon, long walks in the forest
  • Turn Offs: barbershops, silver bullets
  • Favorite music: Van Morrison’s Moondance
  • Seeking: Someone who likes the thrill of the chase

If you like the nightlife then I’m the one for you!

 

Dr Jekyll  by Robert Louis Stevenson

  • DOB: 1886 in London
  • Turn Ons: mixed drinks, chemistry experiments
  • Turn Offs: hangovers, people who are afraid to be themselves
  • Favorite music: depends on my mood
  • Seeking: someone who appreciates me for who I really am

I’m full of surprises, you never know who you’re going to get!

 

Who could resist one of these faces? Or their stories! Just imagine dazzling your friends at your next get together with grand and glorious tales after a night on the town with one of these guys. But you won’t find profiles like these on any old dating website. To see more dating horror stories check out the display at the St. James Library, and swipe right…if you dare!

-Lori

Frightfully Good Reads

darkandstormy

October is such a wonderful time to come to the library. Not only is it Canadian Library Month and filled with programs for those of all ages, but October is the prime month where all you horror fans (or closet horror fans) receive the attention you deserve! Halloween allows us to promote some of our less-advertised collection of thriller and horror books. Reader Services staff at the Millennium library have created a wonderful display, as can be seen in the picture above and offer plenty of creepy books that will frighten, unsettle and give goosebumps to many readers. Therefore, in honour of the creepiest month of the year, here are just some authors whose books you can sink your teeth into, just be sure to leave the lights on…

Stephen King

doctorsleep

What horror list would be complete without the horror master who has written many, many (long) but amazingly creepy and unsettling books. With a recent adaptation of part 1 of his novel IT in theatres and receiving rave reviews (you should go see it, it is fantastic!), check out the source material which is just as good, though clocking in at over a thousand pages, leave yourself some time to read it. There are a few holds on this title so you may have to be patient, but if you are wanting a King fix right away, here are some more excellent and creepy books by him: Salem’s Lot, Mr. Mercedes, Doctor Sleep, Pet Sematary, Cujo, The Mist… and the list goes on. For all King titles, check here.

Joe Hill

heartbox

As the son of the horror legend Stephen King, Joe Hill had some big expectations

 

for his writing career, and he did not disappoint. Check out The Fireman about an epidemic which leads people to internally combust, and Heart-Shaped Box the story of a rockstar who purchases morbid items and finds himself owning a suit containing an old man’s spirit that will do his bidding, the suit arrives in…a heart-shaped box. Naturally, chaos ensues.

Richard Matheson

hellhouse

Did you enjoy the film I Am Legend with Will Smith? No, well you will most definitely enjoy the source material then (remember to take “based on….” With a grain of salt in movies). With all its twist and turns, you’ll be sure to keep the pages turning of this book by the venerable Richard Matheson. The author that brought us the haunted house tale Hell House and many excellent short horror stories will be sure to have you staying up late and listening to every creak you hear from your home, terrified to get out of bed.

Josh Malerman

birdbox

Josh Malerman does not have many novels out, however his novel Bird Box  which I just finished is a fantastic read! I read the review on a blog I frequent and thought the premise, just as the reviewer did, was incredibly unique. Something is causing people all over the world to go crazy; the catch though, is no one knows what this thing looks like because all who have seen it end up dead. The solution, block all the windows, bar the doors and when going outside do so blindfolded. Intrigued? I certainly was. The terror and suspense are excellent and it will have you turning pages, anxious to know what happens.

 

Scott Smith

ruins

A classic horror beginning to a surprising and unconventional novel, Smith’s The Ruins is an excellent read. University students vacationing in the Mexican Yucatan Peninsula come across Mayan ruins covered in vines, once they venture to these ruins, however, villagers block their way back and prevent them from leaving. The reason? Well, you will have to read this book to find out. Those who are squeamish may have to skip certain parts of the book as it can be a bit gory, but if you can get past that, this is an excellent horror novel that had me rapidly turning pages, and itching to finish it.

If you are wanting a collection of supernatural/haunted houses/monster stories, Ellen Datlow has edited fantastic horror compilations which can be found here.   nightmares

If these authors don’t strike your fancy, and you like something more traditional and classic, we have Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde to fit your bill. (Interestingly these are all “creatures” from Universal Monsters which starred Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, and Lon Chaney, Jr., now revamped with the most recent The Mummy starring Tom Cruise, which you can place a hold on.)

Happy Reading!

Aileen

#FitMama

Sure, we all know it.  Exercise is good for us.  But life is busy, and sometimes it can be hard to find the motivation to go to the gym.  Exercise becomes yet another thing on our “to do” list that we need to squeeze in, right after our dentist appointment and right before getting the groceries.

But what if we looked at exercise as an opportunity to set an example for our kids?  What if we chose to exercise as a means of exemplifying a healthy lifestyle, so that our kids could follow in our footsteps?

Before I had kids of my own, I was big into long distance running.  There was nothing better than waking up on a beautiful Saturday morning, and tearing up the pavement for hours on end, with a good set of tunes on my headphones.  Once the kidlets arrived, however, my workout routine changed.  All of a sudden, I was struggling to squeeze in a quick 20 minute workout, and feeling guilty for taking any time at all for myself.

But then I realized something.  If I let exercise take a backseat in my life, my kids will do the same.  I started to see exercise as an opportunity.  An opportunity to teach my kids that exercise should be a priority, no matter what.

So nowadays, I try to ensure that my kids see me lace up my running shoes as often as possible.  I tell them about my weekday workouts at the dinner table, and I invite them to join me for a bike ride on weekends.  Play time often includes wrestling matches, dance parties, and running races around the tree.  I ask the kids to help me carry heavy things, and I point out how incredible it is to be able to use our muscles.  I make a point of commenting on how strong my son and daughter are, and I applaud their ability to jump, skip, and fly through the air.

We stay active, and I am reassured that my kids will grow up understanding that exercise is simply something we do every day.  And why would it be any other way?

If you’re looking for a little inspiration on incorporating exercise into your family life, check out these amazing books, available at the library:

The busy body book: a kid’s guide to fitness
by Lizzy Rockwell
Lizzy Rockwell explains how your bones and muscles, heart and lungs, nerves and brain all work together to keep you on the go. Kids walk and skate and tumble through these pages with such exuberance that even sprouting couch potatoes will want to get up and bounce around–and that’s the ultimate goal.

Oh the things you can do that are good for you!
(Cat in the Hat’s Learning Library)
The Cat in the Hat explains the importance of eating right, staying active, and getting enough sleep.  Also includes fun suggestions for children to increase their activity throughout the day, plus a few healthy recipes for parents to prepare for their hungry broods.

You are a lion! : and other fun yoga poses
by Taeeun Yoo
With simple instructions and bright, clear illustrations, award-winning artist Taeeun Yoo invites children to enjoy yoga by assuming playful animal poses. And she sparks their imagination further by encouraging them to pretend to be the animal – to flutter like a butterfly, hiss like a snake, roar like a lion and more.

Wiggle
by Doreen Cronin
For energetic toddlers (are there any who aren’t? ), here’s a book that invites them to wiggle along with the story. Told in rollicky, wiggly rhyme that begs to be read again and again, Doreen Cronin’s latest romp will have toddlers wiggling, giggling, and then (hopefully) falling into bed, blissfully exhausted!

Watch Me Throw the Ball
By Mo Willems
Gerald is careful. Piggie is not.  Piggie cannot help smiling. Gerald can.
Gerald worries so that Piggie does not have to.  Gerald and Piggie are best friends  In Watch Me Throw the Ball!, Gerald is determined to teach Piggie that ball-throwing is serious business… but Piggie is just as determined to have serious fun.

~ Lindsay

 

 

 

Think Big Thoughts

Up here on the fourth floor of the Millennium Library we’re having fun finding books about philosophy – including the philosophy of…just about anything!  Come join us to see what we have on show or let your mind wander through some of the titles below.

The Story of Philosophy
by Bryan Magee

“The Story of Philosophy, Revised and Updated gives you the information you need to think about life’s greatest questions, opening up the world of philosophical ideas in a way that can be easily understood by students and by anyone fascinated by the ways we form our social, political, and ethical ideas.”

What Philosophy Can Do
by Gary Gutting

“How can we have meaningful debates with political opponents? How can we distinguish reliable science from over-hyped media reports? How can we talk sensibly about God? In What Philosophy Can Do, Gary Gutting takes a philosopher’s scalpel to modern life’s biggest questions and the most powerful forces in our society–politics, science, religion, education, and capitalism–to show how we can improve our discussions of contentious contemporary issues.”

Tsawalk: A  Nuu-chah-nulth Worldview
by Richard Atleo

“In Tsawalk, hereditary chief Umeek develops a theory of “Tsawalk,” meaning “one,” that views the nature of existence as an integrated and orderly whole, and thereby recognizes the intrinsic relationship between the physical and spiritual. Umeek demonstrates how Tsawalk provides a viable theoretical alternative that both complements and expands the view of reality presented by Western science. Tsawalk, he argues, allows both Western and indigenous views to be combined in order to advance our understanding of the universe.”

A Philosophy of Walking
by Frédéric Gros

“In A Philosophy of Walking , leading thinker Frédéric Gros charts the many different ways we get from A to B – the pilgrimage, the promenade, the protest march, the nature ramble – and reveals what they say about us.”

The Cartoon Introduction to Philosophy
by Michael Patton and Kevin Cannon

“In The Cartoon Introduction to Philosophy, Michael F. Patton and Kevin Cannon introduce us to the grand tradition of examined living. With the wisecracking Heraclitus as our guide, we travel down the winding river of philosophy, meeting influential thinkers from nearly three millennia of Western thought and witnessing great debates over everything from ethics to the concept of the self to the nature of reality.”

-Monique