Author Archives: winnipegpublibrary

An Information Guide About Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

 

Missing

Vigil for Tina Fontaine. Winnipeg. August, 2014. Photo credit with changes (Flickr), Steve, Creative Commons License.

On August 3rd the federal government announced an independent Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.  The establishment of such an inquiry was one of the 94 Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.  The current timeline for the Inquiry calls for it’s work to be completed by the end of 2018.

Winnipeg Public Library has created an information guide to help the public learn about the work of the Inquiry as well as the topic of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.  You can find this guide by visiting www.winnipeg.ca/library, opening the “Our Collections” menu and clicking on “Subject Guides”.

Guides

The Inquiry will eventually have it’s own offices, contact information, and website. To learn about the Inquiry, the public should visit this site. Please note the existence of a national toll-free crisis line for anyone needing support after reading the information found within this site.

The “About the Independent Inquiry” section of the site is especially useful.  It provides information about what the Inquiry will and will not (or can and cannot) do, in addition to other practical information such as timelines and budget.

Five Commissioners will conduct the Inquiry.  These include:

  • Chief Commissioner, the Honourable Marion Buller, Provincial Court Judge, British Columbia Mistawasis First Nation, Saskatchewan
  • Commissioner Michèle Audette, Former President of Femmes Autochtones du Québec (Québec Native Women’s Association), Mani Utenam
  • Québec Commissioner Qajaq Robinson, Associate, Borden Ladner Gervais LLP Iqaluit, Nunavut
  • Commissioner Marilyn Poitras, Assistant Professor Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
  • Commissioner Brian Eyolfson, Acting Deputy Director, Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, Legal Services Couchiching First Nation, Ontario

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Perhaps the most anticipated part of the Inquiry’s announcement was its Terms of Reference.  Some groups, such as the Native Women’s Association of Canada, have expressed concerns related to family supports, investigation of cold cases, jurisdictional issues connected to the provinces/territories and the Inquiry, and the need to work with the justice system to implement changes.  Amnesty International has echoed some of these concerns. Others were concerned about representation. Pauktuutit, the national Inuit women’s organization, expressed disappointment that the Inquiry does not have an Inuk Commissioner (Commissioner Qajaq Robinson is not Inuk).

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There have been a number of studies – by both organizations and academic researchers – about missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls over the last number of years.  We have brought these together in our information guide here.  The most recent study, conducted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, concluded that 1181 Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or were murdered between 1980 and 2012.  Some people expect the number is much higher.

Our information guide also has a section of Manitoba-specific information which will be added to as the Inquiry’s work progresses.  Currently you can find a fact sheet (2010) with statistics about missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in our province,  a map of a number of cases, as well as cold case information for some victims.

We have also included a link to a toolkit for families created by family members of missing and murdered women and girls, in partnership with local organization Ka Ni Kanichihk.  The kit provides practical information – including document templates – to assist families whose loved ones have gone missing.

Winnipeg Public Library will update our information guide as the work of the Inquiry progresses, including adding suggested book titles about violence against Indigenous women and girls and Indigenous women’s rights and resilience. We invite everyone to share the guide as a resource for learning about the Inquiry and the important issues it will examine.

As always, we also welcome your questions. You can ask them in person at any of our locations, by calling 204-986-6450, or submitting them online using our Ask Us! service.

-Monique

 

 

 

Microhistories – Fantastic Reads

Summer is here, and that means Winnipeggers will be heading out to our fantastic beaches to relax on the sand. As we build our sand castles and try to keep all those tiny grains from getting onto our towels, it’s interesting to reflect how we are surrounded by trillions of grains of sand that have come together to create the beaches that we enjoy. If you scoop up a handful of sand, each of those tiny grains will have its own source and story. As such, a microhistory is a genre of book that rather than looking at the beach as a whole, finds one grain of sand and tells its story, and in doing so often reveals the story of the beach as well.

This metaphor might be a bit laboured, but microhistories are fantastic reads and I’ve highlighted six that would make a great addition to your next trip to the beach.

PaperMark Kurlansky’s Paper: Paging Through History is an in-depth look at the history of paper and how the invention of paper changed the world. It sounds dry but Kurlansky brings the subject to life and shows how paper as a piece of technology will not be left behind by the digital devices that are now ubiquitous to modern life.

If you like Paper: Paging Through History, Kurlansky has written a number of other excellent microhistories that you can check out at the library. His best known work is Salt: A World History, but Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World, and The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell are also cracking reads that trace the impact of these foods on history.

 

OliveOlive Oil has become a common kitchen ingredient in modern cooking, but do we really know what’s in the bottle in our kitchen? If you are interested in dramatic stories of true crime and delicious descriptions of mouth-watering food, then Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil by Tom Mueller is the microhistory for you. This title explores the history of olive oil, and dives into the worldwide corruption involved in it’s trade.

 

HomeIn  At Home: A Short History of Private Life, Bill Bryson looks at everyday objects that fill the typical modern home, exploring the history of how they wound up there. These ordinary objects are vehicles for the story of how our homes became comfortable refuges from the outside world. Bryson is a gifted writer and he infuses his books with fascinating details and a dry humor.

 

 

PackingHeading in the opposite direction from our comfortable homes on earth and straight into the challenges of space, Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach examines all the different questions that need to be answered before NASA can safely send astronauts into space. From the physical to the psychological Roach leaves no question unanswered. Packing for your summer vacation will seem like a breeze after you read Packing for Mars.

 

ProofIn Proof: The Science of Booze by Adam Rogers, the reader is taken on a tour across the world exploring the current science of distillation and the thousands of years of history and culture behind the alcoholic drinks consumed around the world. This book is for a reader that wants to know all about the scientific and technological details that combine to get a drink into your glass.

 

 

GlassesIf Rogers hasn’t completely slated your thirst for alcohol related literature, try A History of the World in 6 Glasses by Tom StandageProof: The Science of Booze focused on the science of alcohol and A History of the World in 6 Glasses takes on the historical side of the story, using six common drinks (beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea and soda) to trace the development of modern civilization.

 

If these books have piqued your interest, there are many more microhistories waiting for you at Winnipeg Public Library.

Tegan

GO WILD Final Week – GRAB BAG WEEK

This summer, the Library is challenging you to expand your reading horizons! Hunt down titles to meet the challenge of your choice, chat with staff for help, browse our displays, or check out the picks below.

For every week you try something new, enter our prize draws at any WPL branch!

Week 6 (our LAST week) is Grab Bag Week, so who knows what you’ll end up trying:

  • Challenge 16: A book with a year in the title
  • Challenge 17: A book starring a dog or cat
  • Challenge 18: A book with ‘Secret’ in the title

*All of the picks below can be requested for pickup at your closest branch! Search and place holds with our catalog.

Staff picks for Challenge 16: A book with a year in the title

1776 by David McCullough

The intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independence.

1215: The Year of the Magna Carta by Danny Danzinger and John Gillingham

An absorbing portrait of life during a time of global upheaval, at the center of which is the document that has become the root of modern freedom: the Magna Carta.

1491-cover1491: New Revelations of the Americas before Columbus by Charles C Mann

A work of science, history, and archaeology that radically alters our understanding of the Americas before the arrival of Columbus.

1984 by George Orwell

The great modern classic of a “negative utopia,” a haunting novel of a completely convincing imaginary world.

1920: The Year of the Six Presidents by David Pietrusza

The presidential election of 1920, when six once-and-future presidents hoped to end up in the White House: Woodrow Wilson, Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Herbert Hoover, and Theodore Roosevelt.

1942 by Robert Conroy

An alternate history that reimagines December 7, 1941 as a fictional Japanese invasion of Hawaii and the subsequent tale of resistance, sacrifice, and courage.

2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke

The classic science fiction novel that changed the way people looked at the stars–and themselves.

Staff picks for Challenge 17: A book starring a dog or cat

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME by Mark Haddon

Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions. He cannot stand to be touched. And he detests the color yellow.

A DOG’S PURPOSE by W. Bruce Cameron

One endearing dog’s search for his purpose over the course of several lives. Touches on the universal quest for an answer to life’s most basic question: Why are we here?

FIFTEEN DOGS by Andre Alexis

Gods Apollo and Hermes grant human intelligence and consciousness to fifteen dogs who wrestle with the challenges that arise as the result of their elevated thinking.

GRUMPY CAT: A Grumpy Book by Grumpy Cat

Celebrating the Internet sensation’s epic feline frown, and the grouch in everyone, with new photos, grump-inspiring activities and games.

catsI COULD PEE ON THIS, AND OTHER POEMS BY CATS by Francesco Marciuliano

A collection of humorous poems delves into the cat psyche, covering such topics as separation anxiety, scratching at closed doors, and trips to the veterinarian.

HOW TO TELL IF YOUR CAT IS PLOTTING TO KILL YOU by Matthew Inman

Cat comics, facts and instructional guides from the creative wonderland at TheOatmeal.com.

WE3 by Grant Morrison & Frank Quitely

A genetically-altered dog, cat, and rabbit turned into military killing machines have escaped and are desperate to survive with the U.S. army on their trail. Complex, violent, and emotional content–The Incredible Journey for mature readers.

Staff picks for Challenge 18: A book with ‘Secret’ in the title

IN THE PRESIDENT’S SECRET SERVICE: Behind the Scenes with Agents in the Line of Fire and the Presidents They Protect by Ronald Kessler

The experiences of Secret Service agents who served during the administrations of such presidents as JFK, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama.

CAN YOU KEEP A SECRET? by Sophie Kinsella

Meet Emma Corrigan, a young woman with a huge heart, an irrepressible spirit, and a few little secrets. Secrets she wouldn’t share with anyone in the world. Until she spills them all to a handsome stranger on a plane.

THE SECRET KEEPER by Kate Morton

Sixteen-year-old Laurel Nicolson witnesses a shocking murder that throughout the subsequent half century shapes her beliefs, her acting career, and the lives of three strangers from vastly different backgrounds.

DIVINE SECRETS OF THE YA-YA SISTERHOOD by Rebecca Wells

When Siddi inadvertently reveals too much about her Southern childhood in a newspaper interview, her mother, Vivi, virtually disowns her. Vivi’s lifelong friends, the Ya-Ya’s, set in motion a plan to bring the mother and daughter back together.

secrets-of-eden-hires.jpgSECRETS OF EDEN by Chris Bohjalian

Haunted by the final words of a newly baptized congregation member who was subsequently murdered by her husband, the Reverend Stephen Drew abandons his pulpit to spend time with an author who writes best-selling books about angels.

THE SECRET GARDEN by Frances Hodgson Burnett

The gardens surrounding her forlorn new home are Mary’s only escape. When she discovers a hidden, locked door, two unexpected companions help her find a way in. Is everything in the garden dead, or can Mary bring it back to life?

So that concludes our Summer Reading Challenge. Make sure you get your ballots in! The prize draw will be held on August 22.

GO WILD Week 5: Voices Week

This summer, the Library is challenging you to expand your reading horizons! Hunt down titles to meet the challenge of your choice, chat with staff for help, browse our displays, or check out the picks below.

For every week you try something new, enter our prize draws at any WPL branch!

Week 5 is Voices Week, so prepare to hear from a new point of view.

  • Challenge 13: A book written for teens
  • Challenge 14: A graphic novel
  • Challenge 15: A book on LGBTTQ* issues

*All of the picks below can be requested for pickup at your closest branch! Search and place holds with our catalog.

Staff picks for Challenge 13: A book written for teens

CRANK by Ellen Hopkins

Kristina Snow is the perfect daughter, but she meets a boy who introduces her to drugs and becomes a very different person, struggling to control her life and her mind.

THIS IS WHERE IT ENDS by Marieke Nijkamp

The principal of Opportunity High School in Alabama has just finished her speech welcoming the students to a new semester, when they discover that the auditorium doors will not open. Someone starts shooting, and four teens, each with a personal reason to fear the shooter, tell the tale from separate perspectives.

TINY PRETTY THINGS by Sona Charaipotra

Three students at an exclusive Manhattan ballet academy compete for the status of prima ballerina, each willing to sacrifice, manipulate, and backstab their way to the top.

thief.jpgTHE BOOK THIEF Markus Zusak

Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel–a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.

AN EMBER IN THE ASHES by Sabaa Tahir

Laia is a Scholar living under the iron-fisted rule of the Martial Empire. When her brother is arrested for treason, Laia goes undercover as a slave at the empire’s greatest military academy in exchange for assistance from rebel Scholars who claim that they will help to save her brother from execution

UGLIES by Scott Westerfeld

In a world where mandatory cosmetic surgery is performed on everyone when they turn sixteen, Shay escapes to join a band of outsiders avoiding surgery, and Tally is forced to find her and turn her in.

Staff picks for Challenge 14: A graphic novel

THE EXILE: An Outlander Graphic Novel by Diana Gabaldon

Retells in graphic novel format the first Outlander novel from Jamie Fraser’s point of view, revealing events never seen in the original story.

beardTHE GIGANTIC BEARD THAT WAS EVIL by Stephen Collins

The fastidious life of clean-shaven Dave is upended on a fateful day when he grows an unstoppable, impressive beard, in a darkly comic, award-winning meditation on life, death and what it means to be different.

BLACK HOLE by Charles Burns

Seattle teenagers of the 1970s are suddenly faced with a devastating, disfiguring, and incurable plague that spreads only through sexual contact.

CAN’T WE TALK ABOUT SOMETHING MORE PLEASANT? by Roz Chast

A loving celebration of the final years of the author’s aging (and quirky) parents through cartoons, family photos, and documents.

MARCH by John Lewis

A first-hand account of the author’s lifelong struggle for civil and human rights spans his youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., and the birth of the Nashville Student Movement.

HABIBI by Craig Thompson

Follows the relationship between two refugee child slaves, Dodola and Zam, who are thrown together by circumstance and who struggle to make a place for themselves in a world fueled by fear and vice.

Staff picks for Challenge 15: A book on LGBTTQ* issues

BECOMING NICOLE: The Transformation of an American Family by Amy Ellis Nutt

The inspiring true story of a transgender girl, her identical twin brother, and an ordinary American family’s extraordinary journey to understand, nurture, and celebrate the right to be different.

missMISSISSIPPI SISSY by Kevin Sessums

A celebrity journalist chronicles his bullying behaviors throughout his Southern youth, his friendships with such figures as Eudora Welty, and the impact of journalist Frank Hain’s murder on his career.

I’M SPECIAL: AND OTHER LIES WE TELL OURSELVES by Ryan O’Connell

Part-memoir, part-manifesto from a super popular web writer chronicles the coming of age story of a gay man with cerebral palsy in an all-wired, overeducated, and underemployed world.

ANNABEL by Kathleen Winter

Born a boy and a girl but raised as a boy, Wayne or “Annabel” struggles with his identity growing up in a small Canadian town and seeks freedom by moving to the city.

FUN HOME: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel

An unusual memoir done in graphic novel format offers a darkly funny family portrait of her relationship with her father, a historic preservation expert dedicated to restoring the family’s Victorian home, funeral home director, high-school English teacher, and closeted homosexual.

BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR

One night, when Clementine goes with her friend to a gay bar, she becomes captivated by Emma, a punkish girl with blue hair. This event leads Clementine to discover and explore new aspects of herself.

 

 

Only one week left to jump in. What challenges have you tried?

 

 

 

 

Long summer days, hot summer nights

There’s a reason summer is constantly immortalized in books, songs, movies and memories. With the sun shining through the branches of trees swaying in the wind while happy little clouds a la Bob Ross float on by overhead, every magical moment seems full of possibility. Being able to walk out the door without being weighed down by winter woolens doesn’t hurt either. However, summer is a limited time offer, so here are some ideas to help you make the most of it!

Get Outside and Explore

It isn’t always easy to get in touch with your wild side, but if you’re thinking about getting lost while finding yourself in the great outdoors, check out the titles below for places to go, things to do, and tasty treats to keep you fueled up for the adventures ahead.

wild

The down and dirty guide to camping with kids : how to plan memorable family adventures & connect kids to nature

Manitoba wild : scenic secrets of Manitoba

Camping activity book for families : the kid-tested guide to fun in the outdoors

Handy dad in the great outdoors : more than 30 super-cool projects and activities for dads and kids

The new trailside cookbook : 100 delicious recipes for the camp chef

The great outdoors cookbook : adventures in cooking under the open sky

Don’t you worry if the forecast is looking a little gloomy. We’ve got you covered on rainy days as well! Stay inside and get cozy watching one of our streaming movies or TV shows on hoopla, or catch up on your TBR (To Be Read) pile (check out our newest titles here). Rainy days are also a great time to try a DIY!

sticky

Sticky fingers : DIY duct tape projects

The quick & easy home DIY manual

I spy DIY style : find fashion you love and do it yourself

Mason jar crafts : DIY projects for adorable and rustic decor, clever storage, inventive lighting and much, much more

High-tech DIY projects with 3D printing tree

Tree craft : 35 rustic wood projects that bring the outdoors in

 

Whatever you decide to do with your summer, have fun and stay safe! Remember your sunscreen and your water bottle, and when you’re really feeling the heat, don’t forget that you can come to any of Winnipeg Public Library’s twenty branches to cool off in our air conditioned buildings and find a few inspirational books of your own!

Megan

Pokémon Go at Winnipeg Public Library

Seemingly everyone is playing Pokémon Go… and if you (or your kids) aren’t already playing it, you’ve likely heard about it.

Pokémon Go is a kind of digital scavenger hunt.  Your prize?  Pokémon, or “pocket monsters.” What’s unique about it, is that it’s one of the first games on the market to use “augmented reality” — a blending of real life and the online world. The game makes it look like Pokémon appear in real life places by using the GPS and camera on your phone.

Pokémon Go is a social game that gets people active and visiting places in the community. Players can travel to PokéStops to get supplies, and they can travel to Gyms, where trainers battle for their teams and earn badges. More likely than not, when you’re out and about at public places (like Assiniboine Park, or The Forks, for instance), you’ll see likeminded people catching Pokémon together. Complete strangers, instantly friends.

Of course, there are safety concerns. People staring at their phones while walking around… people trespassing on private property… strangers looking to use the game for nefarious reasons. But with a little bit of rule setting, and perhaps a discussion about interacting with strangers, parents need not be afraid. Here are a couple of great articles if you need a bit more convincing:

This game is a cultural phenomenon. It has caught on like wildfire with kids and adults alike; and there is plenty of buzz about it on social media. Celebrities like Mario Lopez, Justin Bieber, and Ellen DeGeneres are self proclaimed addicts of the game. Even Hillary Clinton is chiming in on the craze (much to the delight of late night TV hosts).

And people are going to great lengths in order to catch Pokémon! The dog needs walking? Let’s take the scenic route. We ran out of milk? Let me grab my rollerblades. A visit to Grandma’s house on the other side of the city? Sounds like a plan… as long as we can all go for a stroll in the neighborhood.

Some have even turned their rusty old bikes into Pokémon Go machines, while others have quit their jobs to become full time Pokémon hunters.

But why all the hype? I think a lot of it has to do with nostalgia. Pokémon was originally a video game released in 1995. Many of us played it on our game boys, watched Pokémon cartoons on Saturday mornings, and battled it out with Pokémon trading cards at recess. And over the years, the popularity of Pokémon seems to have stayed strong. Just a few months ago, my nephew was proudly showing off his Pokémon trading card collection. Pokémon Go is essentially a childhood dream, come to life.

And what’s really great, is that it’s getting people out of the house, exploring their own neighborhoods, and cities. It’s bringing a new sense of awareness to peoples’ surroundings, and for some people, it is the first time they are actually visiting a library in years — many of our branches are PokéStops, and Millennium Library is a gym. What a great opportunity to show off all of the amazing things libraries have to offer!

IMG_0446     IMG_0444     IMG_0441     IMG_0442

So if you’re looking to catch a few Pokémon this summer, pop into the library — and while you’re there, sign the kids up for Summer Reading Club and check out a few books to take home with you! I have a feeling it won’t take much convincing. Especially with titles like these at your fingertips:

pokemon handbookPokémon: Ultimate Handbook
This deluxe handbook includes facts and figures for every Pokémon ever. That’s over 480 entries—packed with special tips and Pokédex info—right at your fingertips. It’s the ultimate guide for every Pokémon fan.

 

pokemonxyPokémon XY
Action packed manga!  As the new champion of the Pokémon Battle Junior Tournament in the Kalos region, X is hailed as a child prodigy. But when the media attention proves to be too much for him, he holes up in his room to hide from everyone – including his best friends.

pokemon academyPokémon Academy
A suspenseful chapter book for Pokémon enthusiasts!  Ash, Dawn, and Brock attend a week of training at the academy with their Pokémon, and Ash competes in a triathlon to test his skills against a scary, ghostly Pokémon.

 

runawayThe Runaway Pokémon
A book for the youngest Pokémon fans just beginning to read on their own.  The story of one of Ash’s most exciting adventures.

 

 

japanese animationJapanese Animation: From Painted Scrolls to Pokémon
A sweeping journey through the history of Japanese animation, tracing this cultural phenomenon from its origins in traditional art to the present day.

 

Don’t forget, Winnipeg Public Library also has video games, movies and music!

movie      pokemontournament        movie2

music

What Pokémon have you caught at the library? Let us know on Twitter @wpglibrary!

Lindsay

GO WILD Week 4: Genre Week

This summer, the Library is challenging you to expand your reading horizons! Hunt down titles to meet the challenge of your choice, chat with staff for help, browse our displays, or check out the picks below.

For every week you try something new, enter our prize draws at any WPL branch!

Week 4 is Genre Week, so try out a new genre!

  • Challenge 10: A romance book
  • Challenge 11: A western book
  • Challenge 12: A science-fiction book

*All of the picks below can be requested for pickup at your closest branch! Search and place holds with our catalog.

Staff picks for Challenge 10: A romance book

THE WEDDING CHAPEL by Rachel Hauck

For sixty years, a wedding chapel sat silent, waiting for love. But times have changed and the hour has come when it just might be too late…

lighthouseLIGHTHOUSE BAY by Kimberley Freeman

In 1901, Isabella is the sole survivor of a shipwreck off the sun-drenched
Queensland coast. In 2011, Libby returns to her beachside hometown, where
strange noises and activity at the abandoned lighthouse rouse her curiosity.

SWEET TALK by Julie Garwood

When tough attorney Olivia MacKenzie stumbles into the middle of an FBI sting operation, she makes quite an impression on Agent Grayson Kincaid. But after she asks questions of the wrong people, her life is suddenly endangered.

PREY by Linda Howard

Montana wilderness guide Angie Powell wants nothing to do with ex-soldier Dare Callahan, especially as she blames him for her failing business. But she has to put her feelings aside when they are suddenly thrust together to stop an animal with a thirst for blood—of a human variety.

FOOL ME TWICE by Meredith Duran

A lady on the run, Olivia takes a position as housekeeper in the home of a notorious duke whose files might hold the key to her salvation. The only catch in her plan is the duke himself…

TRUE LOVE by Jude Deveraux

When Alix Madsen inherits a beautiful 19th century Nantucket home for one
year, she discovers the secret of what happened to her ancestor Valentina two
centuries ago. A story of the Montgomerys and Taggerts.

Staff picks for Challenge 11: A western book

HONDO by Louis L’Amour

Hondo is the epitome of a cowboy—a tough, squinty-eyed loner with an underlying gentleness—who comes upon a woman and her son struggling in hostile circumstances.

RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE by Zane Grey

The story of Jane Withersteen, a Utah rancher whose livelihood is threatened by a proposed marriage she does not want, until a lone cowboy named Lassiter comes to town. Often credited for kick-starting the Western genre.

sistersTHE SISTERS BROTHERS by Patrick deWitt

During the American Gold Rush in the Sierra Nevada, Eli and Charlie Sister are hired killers on their way to San Francisco to nail their latest target.

LONESOME DOVE by Larry McMurtry

This Pulitzer Prize winner novel follows ex-Texas Rangers Gus and Call as they go on one last cattle drive.  At once a story of brotherhood and the enduring cowboy spirit, it is also pays homage to a fading frontier.

ALL THE PRETTY HORSES by Cormac McCarthy

At sixteen, John Grady Cole is the last of a long line of Texas ranchers, now cut off from the only life he has ever imagined. So with two companions, he sets off for Mexico on a sometimes idyllic, sometimes comic journey.

TRUE GRIT – Charles Portis

Wilful fourteen-year-old girl, Mattie Ross, hooks up with colourful and subtly comic U.S. Marshal Rooster Cogburn, and heads off in seek of revenge.

 

Staff picks for Challenge 12: A science-fiction book

teleTHE TELEPORTATION ACCIDENT by Ned Beauman

Egon Loeser’s romantic misfortunes push him from the experimental theatres of 1930s Berlin to the physics laboratories of LA. A humorous, and (mostly) coherent novel about sex, violence, space, and time.

THE DISPOSSESSED: An Ambiguous Utopia by Ursula Le Guin

A bleak moon settled by utopian anarchists, Anarres has long been isolated from its mother planet, war-torn yet powerful Urras. Now one brilliant physicist is determined to tear down the walls of hatred that have kept them apart.

THE WINDUP GIRL by Paolo Bacigalupi

In a future where food is scarce, Anderson Lake comes into conflict with Jaidee, an official of the Environmental Ministry, and encounters Emiko, an engineered girl who has been discarded by her creator.

angelANGELMAKER by Nick Harkaway

Avoiding the lifestyle of his late gangster father by working as a clock repairman, Joe Spork fixes an unusual device that turns out to be a former secret agent’s doomsday machine and incurs the wrath of the government and a diabolical South Asian dictator.

REDSHIRTS: A Novel with Three Codas by John Scalzi

A new lab tech on the prestigious starship Intrepid starts to worry about the number of low-ranking officers dying during away missions, and other goings on.

SEVENEVES by Neal Stephenson

Five thousand years after a catastrophic event sends a small surviving remnant of humanity into outer space, the progeny of those survivors–seven distinct races now three billion strong–embark on a journey into the unknown to return to Earth.