Author Archives: winnipegpublibrary

Long Live the King

Books are a uniquely portable magic.

Stephen King

If you were to walk into almost any library or bookstore, odds are you’ll find most of the shelf space for the K authors is given over to books written by Stephen King. Not only does he tend to write long books, he has written a lot of books. For better or worse, Stephen King has ruled the realm of popular fiction for decades, and he shows no signs of stepping down from his throne anytime soon.

Stephen Kingcarrie officially started his writing career in the late 1960’s, submitting short stories to magazines to supplement his salary as a worker in an industrial laundry. His first novel, Carrie, was published in 1974. It was a runaway success, so much so that Stephen was able to write full time for a living, and he hasn’t looked back since. Although a lot about his life has changed since his first book was published, King still lives in Maine most of the year, he’s still an avid baseball fan, and he’s still giving a lot of people nightmares.

standOne of my favourite bits of King trivia is that he met his wife while they were both working in a university library. Coincidentally, I too first encountered him in a library, although in my case it was my school library, while I was skipping out on an inter-mural floor hockey tournament. Up until then, my only exposure to Stephen King was through the television ad for the movie version of The Shining, which scared the pants off me. To this day I don’t know why I picked up that copy of The Stand, but I did, and I’ve been hooked every since.

itI’m the first to admit that his books aren’t the greatest literature, and I don’t enjoy everything he’s written. But there’s something about the vast stories he’s able to create, and the basic humanity of his characters, that keeps me coming back for more. I prefer his ridiculously long books – It, Under the Dome, and my all-time favourite, The Talisman, to his short story collections.

There’s something about his writing that reminds me of the really gruesome original versions of classic fairy tales, where the world is a dark and scary place filled with wolves that eat grandmothers alive, and wicked queens that demand the hearts of children. In those stories, even though terrible things happened, the characters who were clever, strong and brave came through in the end. These stories were originally told as morality tales, to introduce children to the concept of good and evil. talismanIn that regard, there are a lot of similarities between the stories told by the brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen and Stephen King. The monsters in Stephen King’s books are sometimes supernatural, sometimes human, and horrible things happen to good people, but at the end of the day evil is defeated by the powers of good. Ultimately, I have to turn to Stephen King’s own words to explain why his books appeal to me and to so many other readers: “We make up horrors to help us cope with the real ones.”

-Lori

 

 

 

Walk or I’ll punch you.

On a frantic October morning, I had one second of inattention and fell down a flight of stairs which resulted in a snapped 5th metatarsal and a chipped ankle. I ended up in a cast and spent the entire month of November looking out my front window. With the beautiful weather, cyclists abounded, the neighbours walked their dogs, children played. Stuck with only the fish for company, I sat, seething inwardly. With nothing to watch on T.V. but the American election, I started knitting pussy hats. And thinking…

About death…I hate to break this to you but we are all terminal. And since April is Cancer Awareness Month, here are your chances: 2 in 5 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetimes; 1 in 4 will die of the disease…let that hit you…I’ll wait…Truth is we all know someone who has been affected. Looking around Winnipeg, many of our dearest friends have authored compelling books on the subject.

“I am the reason you walk. I created you so that you might walk this earth.”*

 

Reading Melanie Penner’s Our Hope Adventure feels like you are sitting down for coffee with a good friend. Melanie was diagnosed with cervical cancer, and when she was told that it was terminal, she wrote a blog which eventually became her legacy to her family. Although she struggled with how to accept losing all of the good in her life, she did so by taking her husband’s advice to count their blessings every day. She chose to keep focused on the gains she would achieve through her faith. She bravely told her story at many speaking engagements, using her voice to teach others about cancer and to share her absolute faith that God had a plan for her even though she faced such hardships. She challenged all of her followers “to tell someone you love what they mean to you and why you value them…..it has the power to change them and you”.

Born in Roseisle,  Melanie Penner moved to Winnipeg to pursue an Education degree. She was a teacher in the St-James School Division and member of the Whyte Ridge Baptist Church.  You can listen to her interview with Pastor Terry Janke about gains and losses (Phil 3:7 – 11). 

 

“I am the reason you walk. I gave you motivation so you would continue to walk even when the path became difficult, even seemingly impossible.”

 

As Wayne Tefs describes in Dead Man on a Bike, he was motivated to chase away his black thoughts by biking many of the world’s most beautiful cycle paths. He proclaims that a cancer diagnosis can be the best thing that ever happened to you because it gave him his “Punch in the Face” moment… Why ME? …Then comes the moment when you get “helicopter vision”. It is when you realize that all of your materialistic concerns are no longer important. He used his time on his bike to meditate about appreciating the Zen of menial tasks, of embracing love everywhere he found it and of taking solace in doing everything he could while he still had the time. He encourages his readers to be proactive; for him it was the key to well-being. Keep moving forward, keep riding, and most of all enjoy the scenery.

Wayne Tefs was born in St-Boniface, Manitoba and grew up in Northwestern Ontario. After moving to Winnipeg, he became head of the English at St-John’s Ravenscourt School. He was the co-founder of Turnstone Press and author of many articles, biographies and novels.

 

“I am the reason you walk. I animated you with that driving force called love, which compelled you to help others who had forgotten they were brothers and sisters to take steps back towards one another.”

 

In The Reason You Walk, Wab Kinew writes about how his life was also changed when his father, Tobasonakwut, was diagnosed with terminal cancer. Seeking to heal their fractured relationship, Wab embarked on a journey to reconcile with his father. Tobasonakwut was a respected elected leader and a beloved traditional chief who endured a traumatic childhood in residential school. Together, they courageously attempted to repair their family bond. They did so by remembering the lessons of the Anishinaabe travelling song Nigosha anisha wenji-bimoseyan (I am the reason you walk). “We ought to recognize that our greatest battle is not with one another but with our pain, our problems and our flaws. To be hurt, yet forgive, to do wrong, but forgive yourself, to depart from this world leaving only love. This is the reason you walk”.

Wab Kinew was born in the Onigaming First Nation and is the associate vice-president of Indigenous Affairs at the University of Winnipeg. He is a member of Midewin and an honorary witness for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. He is currently the MLA for Fort Rouge in Manitoba.

 

“And now, my son, as that journey comes to an end, I am the reason you walk,”

 

Dennis Maione’s What I Learned from Cancer is his journey through two bouts of colon cancer, both considered primary. Maione, with the help of friends he calls the “background bookworms”, discovered through persistent research that a particular strain of the Lynch syndrome happens to be prevalent in Manitoba’s Mennonite community. As a result, he is genetically predisposed to cancer and that his children may have inherited the same gene. And indeed, they discover that his son is affected. Even though he and his son live under the specter of cancer, they live life fully. Maione gives practical advice such as how to talk to doctors and how to organize your community around you. He encourages his readers to research their conditions, get tested regularly and never to lose hope.

Dennis Maione lives in Winnipeg and is a member of the Manitoba Writers Guild, the Creative Non-Fiction Collective Society, the Manitoba Storytelling Guild and the Writers’ Union of Canada. He maintains a website and blog here.

 

“For I am calling you home. Walk home with me on that everlasting road.”

 

If you or someone you love is facing a cancer diagnosis, I encourage you to use your local librarian as a background bookworm. We excel at finding information. Be it cancer cookbooks, how to cope with grief or trying to reconcile with family, the library will find the resources you need. Can’t leave home? We have eBooks and audiobooks through OverDrive. Need a doctor? Look here. Every journey starts with putting one foot in front of the other, start walking!

6 months, 7 pussy hats and 1 Women’s March later, my foot is now considered healed. I wish I could say the same about the state of the world. All that sitting and thinking made me realize that I can do better. My injury was a blessing in the sense that it gave me a helicopter’s perspective of how important it is to be able to walk. I appreciate that so much more now. So, I will live in the moment. I will appreciate life. I will continue to read so that I may walk in other people’s shoes. I just had my Punch in the Face Moment (lite). When will you have yours?

In memory of Cyril Dufault.

-Colette

*This and the other similar quotes come from Wab Kinew’s book, The Reason You Walk.

 

Read ’em Before You See ’em!

Hollywood’s obsession with books has been carrying on now for a while – and it isn’t showing any signs of slowing down in 2017! Blockbuster hits like the Harry Potter franchise and the Hunger Games trilogy show just how successful film adaptations of kids’ books can be.

Will the movie versions be better than the books? There’s only one way to find out: Read ’em before you see ’em. Check out what’s headed for the big screen in 2017.

May 12
Long Haul by Jeff Kinney
A family road trip is supposed to be a lot of fun…unless, of course, you’re the Heffleys. The journey starts off full of promise, then quickly takes several wrong turns. Gas station bathrooms, crazed seagulls, a fender bender, and a runaway pig – not exactly Greg Heffley’s idea of a good time. But even the worst road trip can turn into an adventure – and this is one the Heffleys won’t soon forget. The film adaptation stars Alicia Silverstone as Greg’s mom and Jason Drucker as Greg.

 

May 19
Captain Underpants by Dav Pilkey
George and Harold have created the greatest superhero in the history of their elementary school – and now they’re going to bring him to life! Meet Captain Underpants! His true identity is so secret, even HE doesn’t know who he is! DreamWorks’ animated adaptation, titled simply Captain Underpants, features the voice talents of Kevin Hart, Ed Helms, Nick Kroll, and Kristen Schaal.

 

May 19
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
A teen girl who can never leave her house, because she’s allergic to just about everything, falls in love with the new boy next door and starts taking risks in this compelling romance/coming-of-age story. The film adaptation of this young adult novel stars Taylor Hickson (Deadpool) and Nick Robinson (Jurassic World, The 5th Wave).

 

November 17
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
Auggie Pullman is an ordinary boy with an extraordinary face. Born with a terrible abnormality, he has been homeschooled and protected by his loving family from the cruel stares of the outside world. Now he must attend school with other students for the first time – but can he get his classmates to see that he’s just like them, underneath it all?  The film adaptation stars Julia Roberts and Owen Wilson as Auggie’s parents, Mandy Patinkin as his understanding teacher, and Jacob Trembly (Room) as Auggie. 

 

December 25
Mary Poppins
 by P.L. Travers

It all starts when Mary Poppins is blown by the east wind onto the doorstep of the Banks’ house. She becomes a most unusual nanny to Jane, Michael, and the twins. Who else but Mary Poppins can slide up banisters, pull an entire armchair out of an empty carpetbag, and make a dose of medicine taste like delicious lime-juice cordial? A day with Mary Poppins is a day of magic and make-believe come to life! The film sequel, Mary Poppins Returns, will be a musical set in Depression-era London, with Jane and Michael Banks all grown up. It stars Emily Blunt as Mary Poppins, Hamilton star/creator Lin-Manuel Miranda as her lamplighter friend Jack, and Meryl Streep as Mary’s cousin, Topsy.

Lindsay

Eat a good book

Saturday, April 8 marks our seventh annual Books 2 Eat celebration at the Millennium Library.

Come and feast your eyes on some amazing edible art pieces inspired by books and created by food lovers of all ages! Celebrity judges, including emcee Chrissy Troy of 103.1 Virgin Radio, will announce the winners at 3:30 pm.

But there’s lots more to enjoy at Books 2 Eat…

  • Browse through a buffet of hands-on family activities from noon to 3 pm: sample healthy treats, try cookie decorating, and play with your food at our games and technology stations!
  • From 1 to 2 pm, families can enjoy a tasty story time filled with mouth-watering tales and a pinch of tasty verses – plus a chance to get hands-on and decorate your own delicious sugar cookie. (Registration required; call 204-986-6488.)
  • Hunt down food-related clues through all four floors of the Millennium Library! Kids and teens can pick up a smorgasbord scavenger hunt sheet at the Children’s Desk. Hand in your answer sheet (right or wrong) by 3 pm and you’ll be entered in our prize draw.
  • Help nourish other families in the city! Winnipeg Harvest will be on hand to share information on their services and to take donations of non-perishables.
  • Enter a draw for a chance to take home some delectable door prizes including baked goods from Chew.

Still hungry? Check out our website for more details!

Danielle

It’s so nice to hear your voice.

There was a time when I believed that audiobooks were cheating – that books were to be read, not listened to. Well, I found out that I was wrong. And what brought me to this conclusion was motherhood – plain and simple. Very early on in motherhood I found out that I had little (read: no, zero, zilch) time to sit and read a book when my motherhood phases went like this:

  • The “Nap when the baby naps” stage, followed by the…
  • “He’s standing on his own two feet – better watch!” stage, followed by the…
  • “We can’t catch up with him! He’s running so fast! Did he even walk?!?” stage (pant, pant), followed by the…
  • “We need to get him up, feed him, get him to school, go to work, get home, eat, get outside, get him ready for bed” stage, followed by the…you get my point.

So whether I was pushing a stroller outside, or in the car on the way to get groceries, or making a meal, I could do these things AND listen to someone tell me a story. Audiobooks kept me connected to stories when I could no longer sit and read a book.

Fast forward to nine years later and audiobooks are something that I still enjoy and that have become an important part of my family’s culture. We listen, think about, and laugh to them. We feel the suspense, share the dread, and also fill up with the hope that the stories inspire. We have one playing in our car at all times and before we’re even buckled in I often hear our son’s voice pipe up with, “Mom, can you turn on [book title]”? At home, we listen to them when building Lego or making a meal or exercising.

Now it goes without saying that a great audiobook depends on a great story. Add a terrific voice to that story and you, the listener, will be transported on a wonderful journey. The following are several of the voice actors that we love to listen to. It was through their voices that we started our journey into audiobooks and have yet to look back (although we will gladly re-listen)! It just so happens that these voice actors also tend to read great stories! But instead of trying to explain what makes them very special, I will let their voices do that. Their voices really do say it all.

(Click on each narrator’s name for a full list of their audiobooks at the library. And in case you don’t already know this, you can borrow audiobooks from us in two formats: CD and electronically through our eAudiobook services, Overdrive and hoopla.)

 

JIM DALE reading from Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling.

 

DAVINA PORTER reading from Outlander by Diana Gabaldon.

 

NEIL GAIMAN reading from Fortunately, The Milk by Neil Gaiman.

 

JAYNE ENTWISTLE reading from As Chimney Sweepers Come to Dust by Alan Bradley.

 

JOHN RAFTER LEE reading from Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett.

 

KRISTOFFER TABORI reading from Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides.

For more audiobook recommendations check out AudioFile – avid listeners, advocates, and reviewers of audiobooks for all ages!

Many great audiobooks await you! Happy listening!

~ Reegan

Stand up for Science

I recall that it wasn’t long ago that Canadian scientists were being told not to speak up in public about their exciting research. Mmm… when did  evidence-based knowledge become all of a sudden subversive? Now the Trump Administration is doing its best to erode public confidence in science by gutting the Environmental Protection Agency budget, removing all mention of climate change from US government web sites, and cutting money from other science-based programs. By rolling back environmental regulations are they betting that society will be grateful for a few dollars saved while the earth becomes increasingly unlivable? This seems so myopic to me, but I digress. Reviewing recently published scientific books, I am amazed at the quality and quantity of what is coming to our shelves (and e-readers). Apparently scientific learning has not stopped, and the following titles are proof that at least some of us are hopelessly curious at deepening our knowledge of the world we live in, and us who live in it.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson, the inspirational popularizer of modern science, spoke about the importance of never giving up our desire to understand: “During our brief stay on planet Earth, we owe ourselves and our descendants the opportunity to explore — in part because it’s fun to do. But there’s a far nobler reason. The day our knowledge of the cosmos ceases to expand, we risk regressing to the childish view that the universe figuratively and literally revolves around us.” Well put.

Here are those promised titles:

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Seven Brief Lessons on Physics by Carlo Rovelli

“… a book about the joy of discovery. Carlo Rovelli brings a playful, entertaining, and mind-bending introduction to modern physics, offering surprising–and surprisingly easy to grasp–explanations of Einstein’s general relativity, quantum mechanics, elementary particles, gravity, black holes, the complex architecture of the universe and the role humans play in this weird and wonderful world. He takes us to the frontiers of our knowledge: to the most minute reaches of the fabric of space, back to the origins of the cosmos, and into the workings of our minds. ‘Here, on the edge of what we know, in contact with the ocean of the unknown, shines the mystery and the beauty of the world,’ Rovelli writes. ‘And it’s breathtaking.'”
(Publisher summary)

index.aspx Why Time Flies by Alan Burdick

“In this witty and meditative exploration, award-winning author and New Yorker staff writer Alan Burdick takes readers on a personal quest to understand how time gets in us and why we perceive it the way we do. In the company of scientists, he visits the most accurate clock in the world (which exists only on paper); discovers that ‘now’ actually happened a split-second ago; finds a twenty-fifth hour in the day; lives in the Arctic to lose all sense of time; and, for one fleeting moment in a neuroscientist’s lab, even makes time go backward. Why Time Flies is an instant classic, a vivid and intimate examination of the clocks that tick inside us all.” (Publisher summary)

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The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and the Power of Seeing by Damion Searls

“In 1917, working alone in a remote Swiss asylum, psychiatrist Hermann Rorschach devised an experiment to probe the human mind: a set of ten carefully designed inkblots. For years he had grappled with the theories of Freud and Jung while also absorbing the aesthetic movements of the day, from Futurism to Dadaism. A visual artist himself, Rorschach had come to believe that who we are is less a matter of what we say, as Freud thought, than what we see.” (Publisher summary)

index.aspx.jpegHit Makers: The Science of Popularity in an Age of Distraction by Derek Thompson

“In his groundbreaking investigation, Atlantic senior editor Derek Thompson uncovers the hidden psychology of why we like what we like and reveals the economics of cultural markets that invisibly shape our lives. Shattering the sentimental myths of hit-making that dominate pop culture and business, Thompson shows quality is insufficient for success, nobody has ‘good taste,’ and some of the most popular products in history were one bad break away from utter failure. It may be a new world, but there are some enduring truths to what audiences and consumers want. People love a familiar surprise: a product that is bold, yet sneakily recognizable.” (Publisher summary)

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Irresistible: the rise of addictive technology and the business of keeping us hooked
by Adam Alter

“In this revolutionary book, Adam Alter, a professor of psychology and marketing at NYU, tracks the rise of behavioral addiction, and explains why so many of today’s products are irresistable. Though these miraculous products melt the miles that separate people across the globe, their extraordinary and sometimes damaging magnetism is no accident. The companies that design these products tweak them over time until they become almost impossible to resist.” (Publisher summary)

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Climate Change and the Health of Nations: Famines, Fevers, and the Fate of Populations by Anthony J. McMichael

“When we think of ‘climate change,’ we think of man-made global warming, caused by greenhouse gas emissions. But natural climate change has occurred throughout human history, and populations have had to adapt to the climate’s vicissitudes. Anthony J. McMichael, a renowned epidemiologist and a pioneer in the field of how human health relates to climate change, is the ideal person to tell this story.” (Publisher summary)

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Finding God in the Waves: How I Lost my Faith and Found It Again Through Science
by Mike McHargue

“In Finding God in the Waves, ‘Science Mike’ draws on his personal experience to tell the unlikely story of how science led him back to faith. Among other revelations, we learn what brain scans reveal about what happens when we pray; how fundamentalism affects the psyche; and how God is revealed not only in scripture but in the night sky, in subatomic particles, and in us.” (Publisher summary)

The Gene Machine: how genetic technologies are changing the way we have kids–and the kids we haveindex-1.aspx.jpeg by Bonnie Rochman

“A sharp-eyed exploration of the promise and peril of having children in an age of genetic tests and interventions. Is screening for disease in an embryo a humane form of family planning or a slippery slope toward eugenics? Should doctors tell you that your infant daughter is genetically predisposed to breast cancer? If tests revealed that your toddler has a genetic mutation whose significance isn’t clear, would you want to know?” (Publisher summary)

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Option B
by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant

“Option B combines Sheryl’s personal insights with Adam’s eye-opening research on finding strength in the face of adversity. Beginning with the gut-wrenching moment when she finds her husband collapsed on a gym floor, Sheryl opens up her heart–and her journal–to describe the acute grief and isolation she felt in the wake of his death. But Option B goes beyond Sheryl’s loss to explore how a broad range of people have overcome hardships including illness, job loss, sexual assault, natural disasters, and the violence of war. Their stories reveal the capacity of the human spirit to persevere… and to rediscover joy.” (Publisher summary)

Enjoy your reading and appreciation of science in 2017!

  • Lyle

Cookbooks still #1!

cookbythebook

Do you love browsing through cookbooks? You’re not alone! Cookbooks are consistently in the top ten subjects that are checked out at Winnipeg Public Library and are usually in the number one spot. Cookbooks currently make up 11% of Winnipeg Public Library’s non-fiction circulation – more than Psychology at 6% and Diet and Fitness at 4%. Fortunately, there are  a lot of new cookbooks being published and the Cookbook clubs couldn’t be happier! Here’s  a look at some of the new titles available at Winnipeg Public Library.

Cheryl made the Breakfast Crepes and Wonton soup from Cheryl pancakesGwyneth Paltrow’s It’s All Easy. Both of the recipes were simple to make and delicious. cheryl soupThis book would make a great coffee table book, as it contains a lot of beautiful pictures of Gwyneth and her family, as well as the food. (A trend we’re noticing with more of the celebrity cookbooks.)

Shirley already owns all of Ina Garten’s cookbooks, so she had to purchase her latest, Cooking For Jeffrey. Rosie also decided to review this cookbook and made Rosie appthe Camembert and Prosciutto Tartines, using tortillas instead of crusty bread – delicious! She also had a look at Alton Brown’s Everdaycook – a really fun book to read. It reads just like Alton talks on his popular TV shows. The Cucumber Lime Yogurt Pops call for 1 tsp. chile powder, but Rosie cut that in half and they still had a nice kick to them.

Star Chef Recipes features several celebrity chefs, with nice pictures and simple, easy to follow recipes. Jackie Chorizo MeatballsJackie made the Chorizo Meatballs, Jackie Stuffed Mushroomswhich can be served as a main course or as an appetizer. The stuffed mushrooms were easy and delicious, but could use a little less Herb d’Provence in them.

The Happy Cook by Daphne Oz tries to do it all – Japanese, Italian, Nadene soupGluten Free – all with a healthy twist. Oz uses a lot of fresh ingredients and offers good substitution options. Nadene made this really quick Kale, Sausage and White Bean soup for her family.

 

Ed would recommend you check Mario Batali’s Big American Cookbook out of the library instead of buying it. Ed chiliThe traditional Texas Chili contains no beans or tomatoes and involves making your own chile powder by re-hydrating dry chiles. It was ok, but Ed prefers the Home Sick Texan’s recipe.

Linda ThaiLynda and Maureen loved Chrissy Teigen’s Cravings. “All of the recipes we tried turned out fantastic and tasty. Chrissy has a refreshingly irreverent writing style with humorous, interesting comments about each recipe. Linda saladShe may be a supermodel but she’s got the appetite of a lumberjack, apparently.” They tried several recipes, including Chicken Lettuce Wraps, Shrimp Summer Rolls, Sweet & Salty Coconut Rice and the butter Lettuce Salad with Blue Cheese and Cayenne Candied Walnuts.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHow To Bake Everything by Mark Bittman is true to it’s title, providing lots of information and 2000 recipes! Dianne tried the Cornbread with Cheddar Cheese and Jalapenos and liked all of the different variations Bittman gives for his recipes. She also reviewed Oprah Winfrey’s latest book, Food, Health and Happiness and made the Turkey Burgers, which were well received.

The Happy Cookbook by Marg 1Lola Berry offers a whole foods approach to cooking, with gluten-free recipes, minimal dairy and no refined sugars. Margaret tried the stuffed mushroom caps, which tasted really good…with the addition of some bread crumbs.

After borrowing Angela Liddon’s Oh She Glows Cookbook from the Library last year, I ended up buying it, so I wasn’t surprised that I Carole macaroonshad to buy her second book – Oh She Glows Every day! Liddon provides excellent plant based recipes that have become staples in our house. I recommend the Fusilli Lentil Mushroom Bolognese, with roasted red peppers, mushrooms and Tahini, which adds a nice creaminess and flavour. We’ve also made the Shepherd’s Pie several times and my new favourite – Vanilla Bean Coconut Macaroons.

Well, are you anxious to get cooking? Borrowing cookbooks from the library is an excellent way to try before you buy. Happy cooking everyone!

Carole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You Maniacs! You Blew It Up!

So this happened this morning: I was on the phone, making sure this blog post would go according to plan, when the person on the other end started telling me things I didn’t want to hear. My legs went wobbly, I stumbled forward trying to maintain my balance and as the cord on my phone grew taut I fell to my knees and wailed: “You maniacs! You blew it up!”

But I should probably start at the beginning. I record that I was born (as I have been informed and believe) on a Monday. [Editor’s note: at this point the author goes on to recount his life in a verbose manner that blatantly rips off David Copperfield. It was cut for the sake of brevity and the reader’s sanity.]

It was at this point in my life that I stumbled across Everything That Remains, a memoir that recounts two guys’ journey from a lifestyle of corporate excess to a minimalism. And that was my eureka moment! I would write a blog post about minimalism. My frantic research on the subject quickly drew my attention to The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo. I thought I was set, but to my horror further research revealed it was a #1 New York Times best seller AND over 3 million copies had been sold. Minimalism was mainstream. Too old hat to share with my readers.

I needed a new angle and quick. Wracking my brain resulted in a quote from Everything That Remains. But it wasn’t just a quote. The authors were quoting themselves having a conversation in which they were quoting another book.1 This was my egads moment! The quote nested itself so beautifully it was as if it were straight out of the plot of Inception. And this, I thought, was my lightbulb moment!  For the book they were quoting was Fight Club.

It became so clear: nerd minimalism. I could recommend Inception (the movie) and Fight Club (the book or the movie). One more recommendation and the nerd trifecta would be complete. Following the tenets of minimalism I conducted a thought experiment. If I could keep only one book on my shelf, what would it be? Obviously, the nerdiest book on my shelf. A book so nerdy, many nerds don’t even know this franchise started as a book.

As excited as I was, my lightbulb quickly shattered. When I double-checked the library catalogue to ensure it was available to borrow, it wasn’t.  The last copy had recently been withdrawn. Of course, it’s nobody’s fault. It happens all the time. Books get dirty, and worn, and damaged to the point where they can no longer stay on the shelves. An Old Yeller moment, to be sure, but it has to happen. I made the necessary calls2 to try and get another copy re-ordered and every effort was made, but ultimately, the book is currently out-of-print.

There is a bit of a silver lining. You can borrow the movie, the remake of the movie, the sequel to the movie, the prequel to the remake of the movie, or any number of graphic novels based on the franchise. And, best of all, the truest form of the book is still available to borrow in the original French (which, alas, I cannot read3). Barring all that, you can still see if the library is able to bring in an English translation using our Inter-Library Loans service.

So what is this franchise you ask? Alas, still so distraught are my feels, I can’t yet bring myself to type its name. Though, dear reader, if you Google the title of this blogpost the answer will be revealed. 4

Alan

1Joshua Fields Milburn and Ryan Nicodemus, Everything That Remains: A Memoir by the Minimalists (Asymmetrical Press, 2013), p. 90

2See the first paragraph.

3My good friend Tim, who does read French, swears the original version is so much better because the author makes clever use of verb conjugation that just isn’t possible in English. I believe him, mostly because ‘Tim’ is such a trustworthy name.

4“You maniacs! You blew it up!” if you’re too lazy to scroll back up to the top.

MYRCA Madness

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March is a month which is special to many people for many reasons. For some, it’s because of St. Patrick’s Day, a time to celebrate their Irish heritage.  For others, it’s all about the basketball, and March Madness. Some years, Easter falls in March, which brings a bunch of reasons to celebrate. For the past 26 years, though, March is also the month when MYRCA voting starts.

And what is MYRCA? I’m so glad you asked. MYRCA or Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award was founded in 1990 as a way to celebrate the International Year of Literacy. Every year since then, the members of the MYRCA committee read and reflect on Canadian fiction that was  written for young people, in order to come up with the annual reading list. This list is available to everyone, and is a great way to promote reading and literacy.

Starting in March, any Manitoba student in grades 5 to 8 who has read at least 3 books on the list is eligible to  vote. These votes then determine which author will become the MYRCA winner for the year. The winning author gets the chance to come to Winnipeg to take part in the awards ceremony. Students from all across Manitoba take part, and it’s a momentous opportunity for students to meet the winning author in person, to ask questions and to present the prize. Past winners have included Kenneth Oppel, David Carroll, Susin Nielsen and Norah McClintock.

Check out this year’s list and you’ll be sure to find something for everyone, from laugh out loud hilarity to non stop hockey action and super scary science fiction.

 

Tank and Fizz: The Case of the Slime Stampede

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Oh no! The cleaning slimes at Gravelmuck Elementary School have escaped and are leaving destruction in their path! Principal Weaver is sure that Mr. Snag, the beloved school custodian, is to blame.  Tank and Fizz, a goblin detective and his troll friend Tank are equally sure that he is innocent and set out to prove it.  Don’t forget to read the pictures in this very funny and somewhat slimy mystery.

 

Last Shot

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Bryan ‘Rocket’ Rockwood has been drafted into the OHL for his skills, not his size. He’s the smallest player on the team, and his teammates and coaches don’t ever let him forget it. Rocket has the determination and the skills to make it in the NHL, but can he earn the respect of the coaches and the other players? Or should he give up his dreams for good?

 

 

The Scorpion Rules

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The world has changed. Cities have been destroyed and empires have crumbled. The planet is now ruled by a supercomputer who has dictated that all of the ruling families must provide a child to be held as a hostage until their 18th birthday to ensure that the world will remain at peace.  Going to war means the death of a hostage.  Duchess Greta thought she was prepared to die, until she meets Elián….

 

There’s a lot more where this came from! You can find these titles, along with all of the others on this year’s list, at any public library or on the Overdrive site. So don’t delay, start reading today! Voting will begin on March 20, 2017, and close at midnight Wednesday, April 12, 2017. All eligible students can vote at the Winnipeg public library of their choice.

Now, when I say MYRCA you say: “Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award!”

Lori

 

Can’t Get Enough Mr. Darcy?

It is a truth universally known that authors take inspiration from works they have read and stories they have heard and loved, this is why there are so many retellings of our favourite stories. Fairy tales and Greek and Roman mythologies are often re-told thousands of times over with unique settings and plots in each version that speak to the author’s and society’s views at the time. Whether they were written to teach lessons as many of Hans Christian Andersen’s tales were or to explain the name of a flower which grows by a pond, all were influenced by how society was perceived at different points in time.

I’m always interested in retellings of fairy tales and mythologies whether they are Young Adult, Children’s or Adult novels, however I am also very much interested in retellings of Classic stories especially those from Jane Austen. Austen’s Pride and Prejudice has been retold many times over and is still being retold in novels and they themselves are being retold in films. If you are a fan of the classic novel, have read it countless times and are looking for something similar but slightly different, give these books and series a try! Or if you haven’t read the original source material, request your copy here.

Pride & Prejudice and Zombies by Seth Grahame-Smith

ppz Did you ever read Pride and Prejudice and think, what this books needs is zombies? If so, this book is for you, if not, give it a try, it may surprise you! Keeping the same text but altering it slightly to include a zombie plague that has overrun England and a warrior Elizabeth Bennet, Grahame-Smith’s novel is a wonderful and fun take on the classic with some fantastic illustrations to boot. There is also a film version of the novel that came out recently which you can also check out, though it veers a bit from its source material it’s still a fun picture.

  Austenland by Shannon Hale

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Ever fantasize about living in Jane Austen’s world? In Austenland Jane Hayes is allowed to truly experience the world of Jane Austen thanks to a gift left to her by her recently deceased great aunt. She travels to an exclusive resort where guests can experience the wonder of the regency era and perhaps even some romance of their own. Filled with hilarity, wit and the fun of a Jane Austen novel, Austenland takes many a fan’s dream of meeting Mr. Darcy and turning it into a reality. There has also been a film adaptation of the novel that is also available starring Keri Russell.

The Lizzie Bennet Diaries – Hoopla digital

ldiaries  The Lizzie Bennet Diaries started out as a web series available through the Pemberley Digital channel on YouTube but has become a phenomenon. Though there are 100 episodes in total they are only around 3 to 10 minutes in length each. This smart, well-acted modern adaptation of Pride and Prejudice is sure to delight those new to the series, with Lizzie Bennet as a graduate student working on her thesis by creating a vlog with her friend Charlotte, and those who loved the book and are craving more of the story. I have to say my favourite episodes are those of Lizzie and Charlotte Lucas, the actors are hilarious together and their re-enactments and imitations of the other characters are spot-on! If you enjoyed this series, Hoopla also has available the Emma Approved web series which is based on the Jane Austen novel Emma, and is excellent as well.

Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld

eligibleLizzie is a columnist of a beauty magazine, Jane a yoga instructor, Mary and Kitty cross-fit enthusiasts, and Charles Bingley was on a Bachelor-type show. Yes, this is a recent adaptation of Pride & Prejudice which is a bit more risqué and deals with contemporary issues (as retellings often do) yet possesses all the feels of the original.

 

 

 

Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding

bjones  Fielding’s beloved novel follows Bridget Jones, a 30-something woman who has a plan for the year to improve her life: lose weight, stop smoking and find a man. In this novel we follow Bridget along through her success and failures as she laments in personal and extremely funny ways to her diary, be prepared to laugh out loud and even think, “I’ve felt that way before.”

 

 

 

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This film is yet another fun, fan’s dream come true. Amanda Price, a huge P&P enthusiast finds a portal that takes her into the novel where characters are not all they seemed in the book. Unfortunately her escapade changes things, and if she wants to keep the story as-is she must unite Lizzie and Darcy, but what’s a girl to do when she is falling for Darcy and Lizzie becomes transported into her world? A truly enjoyable series with some modern twists and laugh-out-loud moments.

Pride and Prejudice has also inspired many spin-offs and continuations of the series as well as authors considering the novel from Darcy’s point-of-view, which all make for fun reads. Click here to see all that we have to offer.

Last but not least, I can’t forget the wonderful adaptations of the famed novel. Whether you swooned over Colin Firth when he exited the pond, or were entranced with Keira Knightley’s Oscar nominated performance or love both, the library has you covered here!

Let me know some of your favourite retellings of P&P or other classics in the comments below.

Aileen