Author Archives: winnipegpublibrary

Pokémon Go at Winnipeg Public Library

Seemingly everyone is playing Pokémon Go… and if you (or your kids) aren’t already playing it, you’ve likely heard about it.

Pokémon Go is a kind of digital scavenger hunt.  Your prize?  Pokémon, or “pocket monsters.” What’s unique about it, is that it’s one of the first games on the market to use “augmented reality” — a blending of real life and the online world. The game makes it look like Pokémon appear in real life places by using the GPS and camera on your phone.

Pokémon Go is a social game that gets people active and visiting places in the community. Players can travel to PokéStops to get supplies, and they can travel to Gyms, where trainers battle for their teams and earn badges. More likely than not, when you’re out and about at public places (like Assiniboine Park, or The Forks, for instance), you’ll see likeminded people catching Pokémon together. Complete strangers, instantly friends.

Of course, there are safety concerns. People staring at their phones while walking around… people trespassing on private property… strangers looking to use the game for nefarious reasons. But with a little bit of rule setting, and perhaps a discussion about interacting with strangers, parents need not be afraid. Here are a couple of great articles if you need a bit more convincing:

This game is a cultural phenomenon. It has caught on like wildfire with kids and adults alike; and there is plenty of buzz about it on social media. Celebrities like Mario Lopez, Justin Bieber, and Ellen DeGeneres are self proclaimed addicts of the game. Even Hillary Clinton is chiming in on the craze (much to the delight of late night TV hosts).

And people are going to great lengths in order to catch Pokémon! The dog needs walking? Let’s take the scenic route. We ran out of milk? Let me grab my rollerblades. A visit to Grandma’s house on the other side of the city? Sounds like a plan… as long as we can all go for a stroll in the neighborhood.

Some have even turned their rusty old bikes into Pokémon Go machines, while others have quit their jobs to become full time Pokémon hunters.

But why all the hype? I think a lot of it has to do with nostalgia. Pokémon was originally a video game released in 1995. Many of us played it on our game boys, watched Pokémon cartoons on Saturday mornings, and battled it out with Pokémon trading cards at recess. And over the years, the popularity of Pokémon seems to have stayed strong. Just a few months ago, my nephew was proudly showing off his Pokémon trading card collection. Pokémon Go is essentially a childhood dream, come to life.

And what’s really great, is that it’s getting people out of the house, exploring their own neighborhoods, and cities. It’s bringing a new sense of awareness to peoples’ surroundings, and for some people, it is the first time they are actually visiting a library in years — many of our branches are PokéStops, and Millennium Library is a gym. What a great opportunity to show off all of the amazing things libraries have to offer!

IMG_0446     IMG_0444     IMG_0441     IMG_0442

So if you’re looking to catch a few Pokémon this summer, pop into the library — and while you’re there, sign the kids up for Summer Reading Club and check out a few books to take home with you! I have a feeling it won’t take much convincing. Especially with titles like these at your fingertips:

pokemon handbookPokémon: Ultimate Handbook
This deluxe handbook includes facts and figures for every Pokémon ever. That’s over 480 entries—packed with special tips and Pokédex info—right at your fingertips. It’s the ultimate guide for every Pokémon fan.

 

pokemonxyPokémon XY
Action packed manga!  As the new champion of the Pokémon Battle Junior Tournament in the Kalos region, X is hailed as a child prodigy. But when the media attention proves to be too much for him, he holes up in his room to hide from everyone – including his best friends.

pokemon academyPokémon Academy
A suspenseful chapter book for Pokémon enthusiasts!  Ash, Dawn, and Brock attend a week of training at the academy with their Pokémon, and Ash competes in a triathlon to test his skills against a scary, ghostly Pokémon.

 

runawayThe Runaway Pokémon
A book for the youngest Pokémon fans just beginning to read on their own.  The story of one of Ash’s most exciting adventures.

 

 

japanese animationJapanese Animation: From Painted Scrolls to Pokémon
A sweeping journey through the history of Japanese animation, tracing this cultural phenomenon from its origins in traditional art to the present day.

 

Don’t forget, Winnipeg Public Library also has video games, movies and music!

movie      pokemontournament        movie2

music

What Pokémon have you caught at the library? Let us know on Twitter @wpglibrary!

Lindsay

GO WILD Week 4: Genre Week

This summer, the Library is challenging you to expand your reading horizons! Hunt down titles to meet the challenge of your choice, chat with staff for help, browse our displays, or check out the picks below.

For every week you try something new, enter our prize draws at any WPL branch!

Week 4 is Genre Week, so try out a new genre!

  • Challenge 10: A romance book
  • Challenge 11: A western book
  • Challenge 12: A science-fiction book

*All of the picks below can be requested for pickup at your closest branch! Search and place holds with our catalog.

Staff picks for Challenge 10: A romance book

THE WEDDING CHAPEL by Rachel Hauck

For sixty years, a wedding chapel sat silent, waiting for love. But times have changed and the hour has come when it just might be too late…

lighthouseLIGHTHOUSE BAY by Kimberley Freeman

In 1901, Isabella is the sole survivor of a shipwreck off the sun-drenched
Queensland coast. In 2011, Libby returns to her beachside hometown, where
strange noises and activity at the abandoned lighthouse rouse her curiosity.

SWEET TALK by Julie Garwood

When tough attorney Olivia MacKenzie stumbles into the middle of an FBI sting operation, she makes quite an impression on Agent Grayson Kincaid. But after she asks questions of the wrong people, her life is suddenly endangered.

PREY by Linda Howard

Montana wilderness guide Angie Powell wants nothing to do with ex-soldier Dare Callahan, especially as she blames him for her failing business. But she has to put her feelings aside when they are suddenly thrust together to stop an animal with a thirst for blood—of a human variety.

FOOL ME TWICE by Meredith Duran

A lady on the run, Olivia takes a position as housekeeper in the home of a notorious duke whose files might hold the key to her salvation. The only catch in her plan is the duke himself…

TRUE LOVE by Jude Deveraux

When Alix Madsen inherits a beautiful 19th century Nantucket home for one
year, she discovers the secret of what happened to her ancestor Valentina two
centuries ago. A story of the Montgomerys and Taggerts.

Staff picks for Challenge 11: A western book

HONDO by Louis L’Amour

Hondo is the epitome of a cowboy—a tough, squinty-eyed loner with an underlying gentleness—who comes upon a woman and her son struggling in hostile circumstances.

RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE by Zane Grey

The story of Jane Withersteen, a Utah rancher whose livelihood is threatened by a proposed marriage she does not want, until a lone cowboy named Lassiter comes to town. Often credited for kick-starting the Western genre.

sistersTHE SISTERS BROTHERS by Patrick deWitt

During the American Gold Rush in the Sierra Nevada, Eli and Charlie Sister are hired killers on their way to San Francisco to nail their latest target.

LONESOME DOVE by Larry McMurtry

This Pulitzer Prize winner novel follows ex-Texas Rangers Gus and Call as they go on one last cattle drive.  At once a story of brotherhood and the enduring cowboy spirit, it is also pays homage to a fading frontier.

ALL THE PRETTY HORSES by Cormac McCarthy

At sixteen, John Grady Cole is the last of a long line of Texas ranchers, now cut off from the only life he has ever imagined. So with two companions, he sets off for Mexico on a sometimes idyllic, sometimes comic journey.

TRUE GRIT – Charles Portis

Wilful fourteen-year-old girl, Mattie Ross, hooks up with colourful and subtly comic U.S. Marshal Rooster Cogburn, and heads off in seek of revenge.

 

Staff picks for Challenge 12: A science-fiction book

teleTHE TELEPORTATION ACCIDENT by Ned Beauman

Egon Loeser’s romantic misfortunes push him from the experimental theatres of 1930s Berlin to the physics laboratories of LA. A humorous, and (mostly) coherent novel about sex, violence, space, and time.

THE DISPOSSESSED: An Ambiguous Utopia by Ursula Le Guin

A bleak moon settled by utopian anarchists, Anarres has long been isolated from its mother planet, war-torn yet powerful Urras. Now one brilliant physicist is determined to tear down the walls of hatred that have kept them apart.

THE WINDUP GIRL by Paolo Bacigalupi

In a future where food is scarce, Anderson Lake comes into conflict with Jaidee, an official of the Environmental Ministry, and encounters Emiko, an engineered girl who has been discarded by her creator.

angelANGELMAKER by Nick Harkaway

Avoiding the lifestyle of his late gangster father by working as a clock repairman, Joe Spork fixes an unusual device that turns out to be a former secret agent’s doomsday machine and incurs the wrath of the government and a diabolical South Asian dictator.

REDSHIRTS: A Novel with Three Codas by John Scalzi

A new lab tech on the prestigious starship Intrepid starts to worry about the number of low-ranking officers dying during away missions, and other goings on.

SEVENEVES by Neal Stephenson

Five thousand years after a catastrophic event sends a small surviving remnant of humanity into outer space, the progeny of those survivors–seven distinct races now three billion strong–embark on a journey into the unknown to return to Earth.

 

The 7 Books in My Beach Bag

beach bag

With a surfeit of titles but never enough time, I am on the hunt for the crème de la crème books to accompany me on my all too brief vacation at the beach.

The Guardian recently examined the term  “beach read” which connotes escapist frothy fare primarily attached to books that lack any “really weighty themes or social significance”  but rather should be “enjoyable and easy with brisk pace and simple diction.” Beach reads usually include best sellers of the James Patterson/Nora Roberts ilk which are readily found in the mass market paperback spinner at your local supermarket. Serious writers don’t usually fall into this genre but literary blogs and magazines have included many novelists of note in their 2016 “must read” summer lists.

Herewith is my curated list of the best of the best books to pack along with my sun screen and thermos of G&T.

modernlovers Modern Lovers by Emma Straub. This is the book that “everyone will be reading” and appears on almost all summer reading lists including CBCbooks.ca. Friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring.

sweetbitterSweetbitter by Stephanie Danler.  Vogue calls it a coming of age story that follows Tass, a transplant from the middle-of-nowhere who finds work at a fancy French restaurant. The New Yorker magazine pays it homage in its “Briefly Noted” column. Danler deftly  captures the unique power of hierarchy in the restaurant world, the role of drug and alcohol abuse and the sense of borrowed grandeur that pervades the serving scene.

Barkskins Barkskins by Annie Proulx caught the attention of Publishers Weekly. Richly evocative and at times brutally stark, Proulx’s epic novel spans 300 years beginning in New France in 1693.

 

 

 

girlsclineEW’s list of “best fiction of 2016 so far” includes The Girls by Emma Cline.  The summer of 1969 comes electrically alive in Cline’s tale of an impressionable California teen drawn into a Manson-like cult—though the setting is ultimately secondary to her story’s searing emotional intelligence.

 

 

summerbeforeThe Summer before the War by Helen Simonsen. The Washington Post recommends this novel that begins in pre-World War 1 England for Anglophiles mourning the end of Downton Abbey.

 

 

 

nestThe Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney is one of Oprah-endorsed “beach reads that sizzle.” A reckless eldest brother drains the trust fund meant for himself and his three adult siblings, forcing them, with the prospect of a midlife bailout gone, to finally confront hard truths in this closely observed, charming novel.

 

 

homegoingAccording to the Huffington PostHomegoing by Yaa Gyasi is a “Summer 2016 Book you won’t want to miss.” Gyasi maps out the wide-reaching aftermath of the African slave trade, following two branches of a family tree — one daughter married to a British colonizer in Ghana, the other, unbeknownst to her sister, sold into slavery in America — over the course of several generations.

 

What are you reading on your vacation or, sigh, commute to work ?

Jane

 

What’s Your Style?

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– Ignacio Estrada

At this time of year it seems odd to think about teaching and learning. There’s no school, it’s prime vacation time, and people are looking at ways to kick back and disengage their brains.  But knowing and understanding your learning style, whether you’re an adult or a child, can help you to make the most of your holidays and leisure time, not to mention making learning easier and more fun.

Studies have shown that learners can be grouped into three broad categories: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. So, if you’re a visual learner like me, you enjoy reading, looking at charts, maps and diagrams, and other visual media like photographs and paintings. If you prefer audiobooks, music, podcasts and live theatre you’re probably an auditory learner. The kinesthetic learners among us are those who prefer to actively take part in whatever is going on – hands-on demonstrations, interactive displays, and computer programs. They’re likely the person who tries new ways of doing things to see what happens. Not sure which category best fits visual.pngyour style? Try this easy exercise: imagine that you’re going on a long plane ride and you want to learn more about your destination before you arrive. You can only bring one item to do your research. What do you choose: a book to read, a book to listen to, or an interactive computer program? Whatever item you choose is a good indicator of your learning style.

Connecting with your learning style can not only help you learn better, it can enhance the quality of your leisure time. Take me for example, a visual learner. For my upcoming holidays, my list of things to do contains activities like taking in the travelling exhibit Anne Frank: A History for Today at the Millennium library, and planning my next trip using travel guides I’ve downloaded from Overdrive.

If you’re a fan of all things audio then take a listen to the audio books on Hoopla, or try the Naxos Jazz and  Naxos Music Library on our databases. Or you can check out the Tales at Night: Library Happy Hour at the Good Will Social Club where library staff will read aloud hot and sultry stories for your listening pleasure.

rositaLike to learn by doing? Join a cookbook or knitting club at a branch and share in the joys, sorrows, triumphs and tragedies that accompany these activities. Need to update your resume? Come to the Preparing a Resume program and learn how to showcase your skills.  Want to learn how to do almost anything? Check out lyndaLibrary, where you can find more learning opportunities than you’ve ever dreamed of.

Visual, audio, or kinesthetic, we’re all learning all the time. But knowing how you learn most effectively can save you a lot of time, effort and frustration. So, knowing what you know now, how are you going to learn next?

Lori

Beyond Anne’s Diary

Diary Young GirlI have a vivid memory of being in my local library as a kid and picking up The Diary of a Young Girl (also known as The Diary of Anne Frank). My Mom said to me: “I’m not sure if you should read that. It’s very sad!” She thought it best to shield me from the heartbreak of Anne’s story for just a little bit longer. Fast-forward about 15 years and I was asked to be one of the tour guides for the travelling exhibit currently at Millennium Library – Anne Frank: A History for Today. At this point, I had seen the play multiple times and even visited the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, but I still hadn’t done the diary justice.

So, I just recently read the famed book and of course my Mom was right, it is a heartbreaking story! Most people know what happened to Anne, her family, and the six million other Jewish people the Nazis systematically murdered (not to mention the other groups Hitler persecuted based on ethnicity, ability, sexuality, etc.). It’s a devastating piece of history, but when reading the diary there are moments where you somehow forget how the story ends. Anne’s writing is eloquent and you can’t help but be sucked in by the unexpected humour, glimpses of teenage romance, and Anne’s perpetual charm.

As Anne’s diary is a cultural phenomenon, I was not entirely surprised to find a variety of other books about her life. The following titles take the diary in new directions and cross into different genres. No matter what your age, there is a version of Anne’s story for you. Each of these books can be found at the Winnipeg Public Library, but be sure to keep searching as this is just a fraction of our collection on Anne Frank, the Holocaust, and World War II.

 

Anne Frank MullerAnne Frank: The Biography

In this first biography of Anne Frank, Melissa Müller’s thorough research creates a compelling portrait of Anne’s life. Originally printed in 1998, this book contains interviews with family and friends, as well as previously unpublished letters and documents. A new edition of this biography was released in 2014, full of even more information that has since emerged. These documents, along with the Frank’s family tree and an epilogue by one of the family’s helpers, Miep Gies, shine light on this incredible girl.

 

Anne Frank House BioThe Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography

This biography in graphic novel form is an illustrated account of Anne’s life. New York Times bestselling authors, Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón, seamlessly work Anne’s story into the history of World War II and the Holocaust. The book contains a concise chronology of events in the history of the Frank family – an extremely helpful tool for any reader.

 

Anne Frank Hudson-GoffAnne Frank

This graphic novel by Elizabeth Hudson-Goff focuses on both sides of the attic – life before going into hiding and a glimpse at what her final days in a concentration camp may have looked like. A quick read that can easily be finished in one sitting, illustrations bring a new dimension to this famous story of survival.

 

Anne Frank Poems AgosinDear Anne Frank: Poems

A poetry collection that is a tribute to Anne’s life. In most pieces, Marjorie Agosín holds a conversation with Anne, addressing her courage and curiosity. Poetry, and the dialogue Agosín creates, brings Anne’s narrative to life in a unique way.

 

 

Anne Frank PooleAnne Frank

A beautifully illustrated picture book that relays Anne’s story – from birth to death – to a younger audience. By explaining how the Franks end up in hiding, Josephine Poole provides an introduction to the Holocaust for children that is easy to understand. The story ends on a positive note, with Otto, Anne’s father, receiving her diary after the war. The diary ensures that the rest of the Frank family will live on after their senseless deaths.

 

Anne Frank WorldAnne Frank in the World, 1929-1945

This book is a history in pictures published by the Anne Frank House. While the focus is primarily on the Holocaust, the book is framed by Anne’s story. By continually returning to photos of the Franks, the reader is reminded that the victims of the Holocaust are not just a statistic but are real people.

 

“ANNE FRANK: A HISTORY FOR TODAY” Exhibit and Tours

 

Anne Frank Exhibit

The travelling exhibit has come all the way from the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam! It officially launched on Monday, July 11, at the Millennium Library, where it will run until September 3rd. We encourage everyone to spend some time looking at the beautifully crafted panels.

There are also a number of guided tours available, in English or French, that you can register for by calling 204-986-6489. Each tour will begin in the Carol Shields Auditorium (second floor) and will last up to 90 minutes. Those who want to book group tours for more than 10 people can register by calling 204-986-6458.

  • Stephanie

GO WILD Challenge Week 2: AUTHOR WEEK

So we’re starting the second week of our GO WILD Summer Reading Challenge. Have YOU taken the challenge yet?

(I tried to read a horror book — HEX by Thomas Olde Heuvelt — but it was too creepy and I had to stop.)

This summer, the Library is challenging you to expand your reading horizons! Each week we offer three ways for you to read something you might never have read before. Find all the Challenges at your favourite WPL branch (or online).  Chat with staff to find a great title for any challenge, or check out the little list of recommended reads below.

For every week you try something new, enter our prize draws at any WPL branch!

Week 2 is Author Week, and all the challenges have to do with the author of the book:

  • Challenge 4: A book by a Manitoba author
  • Challenge 5: A book by an Indigenous author
  • Challenge 6: A book by a first-time author

 

Staff picks for Challenge 4: A book by a Manitoba author

indexTHE HOUSE ON SUGARBUSH ROAD by Méira Cook

Tells the story of an Afrikaner family and their domestic servant Beauty Mapule set in post-apartheid Johannesburg.

BALDUR’S SONG: A Saga by David Arnason

Musically blessed Baldur is haunted by Lara—his muse and tormentor – who leads him from small town Manitoba to the boom town days of early Winnipeg.

A LARGE HARMONIUM by Sue Sorensen

English professor Janey wonders if she’s coming unraveled, as she faces a daily life of work, friends and family, and her despotic toddler Little Max.

A COMPLICATED KINDNESS by Miriam Toews

Stuck working at a chicken slaughter-house in a town run by religious fundamentalists, 16-year-old Nomi still bears witness to the dissolution of her family with a dark, sly wit.

anothercountryTHE PAST IS ANOTHER COUNTRY: 12 Stories by New Canadians

Two volumes by 24 newcomers participating in writing groups held by the Winnipeg Public Library.

HAUNTED WINNIPEG: Ghost Stories from the Heart of the Continent by Matthew Komus

Early Winnipeg was full of excitement — murders, cheating lovers and tragic accidents. Discover the city’s best known ghost stories, as well as some new ones.

DANCING GABE: One Step at a Time by Daniel Perron

The journey of Gabe Langlois, one of Winnipeg’s most recognized figures.

LAURA REEVES’ GUIDE TO USEFUL PLANTS: From Acorns to Zoom Sticks by Laura Reeves

Identifying, harvesting and preparing over 65 of Manitoba’s most intriguing wild plants and mushrooms.

 

Staff picks for Challenge 5: A book by an Indigenous Author

SANAAQ: An Inuit Novel by Mitiarjuk Nappaaluk

The daily life of Sanaaq, her daughter Qumaq, and their small northern Quebec community facing the growing intrusion of the qallunaat (the white people).

4-1THE LONE RANGER AND TONTO FISTFIGHT IN HEAVEN by Sherman Alexie

With wrenching pain and wry humor, these 22 linked stories present contemporary life on the Spokane Indian Reservation

THE ORENDA by Joseph Boyden

The French conquest of Canada through the eyes of Huron (Wyandot) warrior Bird, his Iroquois captive Snow Falls, and Jesuit Missionary Père Christophe.

MANITOWAPOW: Aboriginal Writings from the Land of Water by Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair

An amazing collection including historical writings, stories, poetry, nonfiction, and speeches.

BETTY: The Helen Betty Osborne Story by David Alexander Robertson

In 1971, aspiring teacher Betty was abducted and murdered by four young men. Initially met with silence and indifference, her story resonates loudly today.

THE STRENGTH OF WOMEN, ÂHKAMÊYIMOWAK by Priscilla Settee

jacketUFSH22F5Personal recollections by a wide spectrum of Aboriginal women tell stories of injustice, racism, genocide and sexism, but also of awakening, fierce struggles and hope.

THEY CALLED ME NUMBER ONE: Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School by Bev Sellars

Bev Sellars, Chief of the Soda Creek Nation in northern B.C., describes the impact of St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School (which operated from 1891 to 1981) on herself, her mother and her grandmother.

 

Staff picks for Challenge 6: A book by a first-time author

SPEAK by Louisa Hall

Explores how the gap between computer and human (shrinking with each technological advances) echoes the one that exist between ordinary people.

SORCERER TO THE CROWN by Zen Cho

Former slave Zacharias Wythe has just been appointed England’s new Sorcerer Royal – and faces a dwindling national supply of magic.

gutHOW TO MAKE WHITE PEOPLE LAUGH by Negin Farsad

An Iranian-American-Muslim female stand-up comedian asks how can we combat the racism, stereotyping, and exclusion that happen every day?

GUT: The Inside Story of Our Body’s Most Underrated Organ by Giulia Enders

What’s the connection between diet and mood? Our gut reactions are intimately connected with our physical and mental well-being.

THE STAR SIDE OF BIRD HILL by Naomi Jackson

Sent to Barbados after their mother can no longer care for them, sisters Phaedra and Dionne spend the summer of 1989 with their grandmother Hyacinth, a midwife and specialist in the local spiritual practice of obeah.

videoTHE HOURGLASS FACTORY by Lucy Ribchester

Amid the suffragette movement in Victorian London, the disappearance of a famous trapeze artist in the middle of her act leads a young Fleet Street reporter and a police inspector into the world of a bizarre secret society.

THE LAST DAYS OF VIDEO by Jeremy Hawkins

When a Blockbuster Video opens up near a declining mom and pop video store owned by a drunk pop-culture junkie, the store’s misfit employees conduct a series of wild schemes to fight the big box invasion.

 

Have you tried something new? How did it go?

  • Erica

 

 

 

 

“Secret” Things the Library Can Do for You: Part 2, Totally Online Stuff

HERE IT IS. The long-awaited second installment of things you never knew about the library. Today we’ll be talking about some of the techy secrets – the things the library offers 24/7 through our website.

Woman with laptop looking shocked.

I know. I’m excited, too.

 

A lot of times when I have to tell someone there’s a waiting list for a book they want they seem so disheartened. “But don’t give up!” I say, “there are audiobook versions! And eBook versions! And eAudiobook versions!” Often they end up with the book they want, just not how they expected.

(I know it can be daunting to get set up with a new format, but remember, you can always ask us for help.)

So here’s a super quick run down of the online and downloadable info and entertainment you can get through us, in case it helps you find something fun, interesting, or informative. It can all be found through our website as shown below, or through our eMedia Guide.

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I drew the red arrows myself.

 

Warning: A lot of these services have nonsense names, so it’s easy to get confused. But you’ll get used to it!

 

More than 5000 eAudiobooks!

I’ve just recently become reacquainted with the joy of being read to. It’s a fabulous way to squeeze more reading into your life, since you can do it bussing or driving, or while doing housework, cooking, or gardening. We offer two ways to find thousands of electronic audiobooks – through OverDrive and Hoopla (more about both below).

 

TV and movies! And music!

hooplaHoopla also offers free streaming of movies, TV shows, and popular music. No holds, wait lists or fines. Hoopla! A different music service, called Naxos Music Library has tons of classical, folk, world and jazz music.

 

Magazines!

zinDownload full-colour, complete issues of magazines, like US Weekly, National Geographic, Mental Floss, Newsweek, Cosmo and more straight to your tablet with Zinio for Libraries. And then they’re yours to keep forever!

 

eBooks, so many ways!

We are a library, after all, and books are a big part of what we do. Some of our eBooks can be read right in your web browser (no apps to download or set up). This is offered through: Overdrive,  McGraw Hill, Tumble Books, and Bookflix.

McGraw Hill eBooks offers eBooks in lots of subjects like business, computing, nursing, languages and sciences chemistry, mathematics, psychology, accounting and computing.

tumblebooklogoTumble Book Cloud and Tumble Book Cloud Junior have eBooks, read-alongs, classic works of literature and audiobooks for EAL audiences, high-schoolers, and elementary school kids. Read-alongs are especially great for those still struggling with reading, or for EAL students. There are never any waiting lists for these.

Tumble Book Library is also great for kids as they are animated, talking children’s picture books adapted from print books, but made interactive with quizzes, puzzles and memory games.

BookFLIX does something pretty unique, in that it pairs classic storybooks with related non-fiction books, so kids can learn new things in the context of their favourite stories.

frodWe also subscribe to two downloadable eBook services – Overdrive and Freading – so that you can download books to your mobile device (smart phone, tablet, or eReader) and take them wherever you go. Overdrive is great for popular, newer titles. Using it is very similar to print books, though, in that the library pays per copy of each book, so you might find yourself on the waiting list for something in demand. Freading is great for when you want to find an ebook right away as they offer unlimited use of the books we purchase from them.

Did you already know any of these secrets??

 

Happy reading (and watching, and listening)!

– Erica